April 2014
Volume 55, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   April 2014
EFFECT OF ANATOMIC FACTORS ON OCULAR SURFACE TEMPERATURE IN EYES WITH ANGLE CLOSURE.
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kenji Matsushita
    Ophthalmology, Osaka University Medical School, Suita, Japan
  • Rumi Kawashima
    Ophthalmology, Osaka University Medical School, Suita, Japan
  • Shinichi Usui
    Ophthalmology, Osaka University Medical School, Suita, Japan
  • Kohji Nishida
    Ophthalmology, Osaka University Medical School, Suita, Japan
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science April 2014, Vol.55, 4067. doi:
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      Kenji Matsushita, Rumi Kawashima, Shinichi Usui, Kohji Nishida; EFFECT OF ANATOMIC FACTORS ON OCULAR SURFACE TEMPERATURE IN EYES WITH ANGLE CLOSURE.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2014;55(13):4067.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose: To evaluate the effect of anatomic factors on the ocular surface temperature in eyes with angle-closure.

Methods: We investigated 26 eyes with angle-closure (19 eyes of 13 patients with primary angle closure; 7 eyes of 6 patients with suspected primary angle closure), who had no history of surgery and used no topical medication. The ocular surface temperature was measured immediately after eye opening and every second during 10 seconds of eye opening using the ocular surface thermographer (TG-1000, Tomey Corporation, Inc., Nagoya, Japan); the anatomic factors (central corneal thickness, pupillary diameter, anterior chamber depth and volume, and ocular axial length) were measured using a Scheimpflug-based corneal topographer (Pentacam HR, Oculus GmbH, Wetzlar, Germany). Multiple regression analysis using JMP9.0 software (SAS Institute Inc., Cary, NC) was performed to examine how changes in ocular surface temperature were affected by stage of angle closure, gender, right or left eye, room and body temperature, age, and anatomic factors. This study was registered with the internal review board and was approved by the institutional ethics committee.

Results: In angle-closure eyes, the ocular surface temperature significantly decreased during the 10 seconds after eye opening (-0.44±0.30°C). The temperature immediately after eye opening was determined predominantly by pupillary diameter, axial length, and anterior chamber volume (R2=0.36, p=0.02), and the temperature 10 seconds after eye opening was determined predominantly by pupillary diameter, central anterior chamber depth, and age (R2=0.36, p=0.03). On the other hand, the change in ocular surface temperature during that 10 seconds was determined predominantly by age, gender, ocular axial length, and central corneal thickness (R2=0.63, p<0.01), and the maximal change during 10 seconds was determined predominantly by age, gender, body temperature, and central anterior chamber depth (R2=0.56, p<0.01).

Conclusions: We found that the ocular surface temperature might be affected by anatomic factors in angle-closure eyes.

Keywords: 479 cornea: clinical science • 550 imaging/image analysis: clinical • 421 anterior segment  
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