April 2014
Volume 55, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   April 2014
Retinal Blood Oxygen Saturation Disturbances in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Faryan Tayyari
    School of Optometry and Vision Science, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, Canada
  • John G Flanagan
    School of Optometry and Vision Science, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, Canada
    Ophthalmology and Vision Sciences, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada
  • Lee-Anne Khuu
    Ophthalmology and Vision Sciences, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada
  • Susith Kulasekara
    Ophthalmology and Vision Sciences, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada
  • Shaun Singer
    Ophthalmology and Vision Sciences, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada
  • Michael Brent
    Ophthalmology and Vision Sciences, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada
  • Christopher Hudson
    School of Optometry and Vision Science, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, Canada
    Ophthalmology and Vision Sciences, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science April 2014, Vol.55, 4437. doi:
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Faryan Tayyari, John G Flanagan, Lee-Anne Khuu, Susith Kulasekara, Shaun Singer, Michael Brent, Christopher Hudson; Retinal Blood Oxygen Saturation Disturbances in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2014;55(13):4437.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Purpose: To assess disturbances in retinal blood oxygen saturation in patients with mild-to-moderate non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR).

Methods: Non-invasive hyperspectral retinal (HR) imaging (H-8.5 HR Camera, Optina, QC, Canada) was acquired in five participants with mild-to-moderate NPDR (67±8.5 years) and eight age-matched controls (69.4±5.3 years). For each subject, six repeated retinal images were acquired at wavelengths of 586 and 605nm using the HRC. This technology has a custom-built mydriatic fundus camera with a tunable light source. It permits the acquisition of hyperspectral retinal images for multiple wavelengths, without flash and is able to transmit wavelengths of 400-1000nm with a bandwidth of 2nm. The diabetic subject group and age-matched controls were free from major cardiovascular disorders. Subjects with a history of thyroid disorders were also excluded.

Results: Retinal blood oxygen saturation in the arterioles of healthy controls was 91.88±1.2%, and in the venules was 55.34±2.8%. Retinal blood oxygen saturation for diabetic subjects with NPDR were significantly higher at 95.36±2.4% (p=0.007) in the arterioles and 62.54±3.4% (p=0.002) in the venules.

Conclusions: Retinal blood oxygen saturation was significantly higher in the diabetic patients than in the age-matched controls. This finding could be the result of reduced retinal blood flow or reduced oxygen utilization, or a combination of both, in the diabetic NPDR group with mild to moderate DR.

Keywords: 499 diabetic retinopathy • 550 imaging/image analysis: clinical • 688 retina  
×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×