April 2014
Volume 55, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   April 2014
Axial length comparison between two ultrasound devices and a partial coherence interferometry device
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Hang Tran
    Western University of Health Sciences, Pomona, CA
  • Kevin Yum
    The Eye Center, Champaign, IL
    U of Illinois, Champaign, IL
  • Jessica Taibl
    The Eye Center, Champaign, IL
    U of Illinois, Champaign, IL
  • David Hjelmstad
    The Eye Center, Champaign, IL
    Arizona State University, Phoenix, AZ
  • Samir I Sayegh
    The Eye Center, Champaign, IL
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships Hang Tran, None; Kevin Yum, None; Jessica Taibl, None; David Hjelmstad, None; Samir Sayegh, None
  • Footnotes
    Support None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science April 2014, Vol.55, 5858. doi:https://doi.org/
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      Hang Tran, Kevin Yum, Jessica Taibl, David Hjelmstad, Samir I Sayegh; Axial length comparison between two ultrasound devices and a partial coherence interferometry device. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2014;55(13):5858. doi: https://doi.org/.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose: To compare axial length measurements of cataractous eyes between a classic A-scan ultrasound device (DGH 5100E) to two next generation devices, a newer A-scan ultrasound device (DGH 6000) and a partial coherence interferometry device (IOLMaster 500).

Methods: We performed a retrospective review of axial lengths of cataractous eyes prior to undergoing surgery. Two A-scan ultrasound devices and one partial coherence interferometry (PCI) device were used to measure axial lengths on the same patient with cataractous eye(s) on the same day. The non-contact method, PCI, was used first followed by the two contact methods, classic and newer A-scan ultrasound. Axial lengths for all three devices were recorded and analyzed using paired t-test. Mean, mean difference, standard deviation, and p-values for comparisons of PCI versus classic A-scan ultrasound, and newer A-scan ultrasound versus classic A-scan ultrasound were reported.

Results: The axial lengths of 79 cataractous eyes (46 patients) were measured with the classic A-scan ultrasound and PCI. A subset of 14 eyes of 13 patients was measured for axial lengths using the newer A-scan ultrasound. The mean axial lengths were 24.14 mm (classic A-scan ultrasound), 24.29 mm (PCI), and 23.85 mm (newer A-scan ultrasound). There was statistical significance between PCI versus classic A-scan ultrasound (mean difference=0.15 mm, standard deviation=0.25 mm, p-value < 0.01). There was no statistical significance between newer A-scan ultrasound versus classic A-scan ultrasound (mean difference=0.09 mm, standard deviation=0.18 mm, p-value =0.07).

Conclusions: When comparing the classic A-scan ultrasound system, the PCI system provided longer axial length while the newer A-scan ultrasound provided shorter axial length. There was statistical significance between axial lengths provided by PCI and classic A-scan ultrasound. There was no statistical significance between the newer A-scan ultrasound and classic A-scan ultrasound.

Keywords: 445 cataract • 552 imaging methods (CT, FA, ICG, MRI, OCT, RTA, SLO, ultrasound) • 465 clinical (human) or epidemiologic studies: systems/equipment/techniques  
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