June 2015
Volume 56, Issue 7
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2015
Biotic Implant for Local Oxygenation
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jeffrey Olson
    Ophthalmology, University of Colorado, Aurora, CO
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships Jeffrey Olson, Regents of the University of Colorado (P)
  • Footnotes
    Support None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2015, Vol.56, 2479. doi:https://doi.org/
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Jeffrey Olson; Biotic Implant for Local Oxygenation. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2015;56(7 ):2479. doi: https://doi.org/.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract
 
Purpose
 

Ischemic retinal vascular diseases such as diabetic retinopathy are characterized by decreased oxygen to retinal photoreceptors. This localized tissue hypoxia in turn leads to photoreceptor damage and death. This study tests the hypothesis that a bioimplant containing oxigenic unicellular organisms can be encapsulated and used as a device to deliver oxygen using in vitro models.

 
Methods
 

Prototype devices consisting of dialysis membranes with a silicone endcap were constructed. These allow passage of light and small molecules such as oxygen, carbon dioxide, and sugars, but restrict passage of cells. Three devices were filled with Synechococcus cyanobacteria and three control devices filled with saline. Each device was then placed in a 50 mL closed container of saline and continuous oxygen recordings taken for nine hours. The main outcome measure was the difference in the initial and final oxygen partial pressure (pO2) of the saline, and the two groups compared using a paired t-test.

 
Results
 

At baseline, there was no difference in the pO2 between the active group (108.9 +/-1.37 mmHg) and the control (110.73 +/- 0.65 mmHg, p = 0.11). After nine hours, the p02 in the Synechoccocus group increased 28% from baseline (138.99 +/- 1.71 mmHg, p = 0.0005) and the control group increased by 2% (112.4 +/- 1.10 mmHg, p = 0.07). This slight increase was thought to be artifact from exposure of the saline to room air from placement of the oxygen sensor. The difference in the final pO2 concentration between the two groups was statistically significant (p = 0.001).

 
Conclusions
 

These results are consistent with the hypothesis that oxygen producing Synechoccocus cyanobacteria can be encapsulated in a device and used to produce oxygen in vitro. Further ex vivo and in vivo testing is needed, but such a device implanted in the vitreous cavity may prove useful in ischemic retinopathies to reverse the local tissue hypoxemia.  

 
Oxygen Content in Saline<br /> At baseline, the oxygen concentration between groups was similar (p=0.11). After 9 hours, there is a statistically significant increase in the oxygen concentration in the implant group (P=0.001).
 
Oxygen Content in Saline<br /> At baseline, the oxygen concentration between groups was similar (p=0.11). After 9 hours, there is a statistically significant increase in the oxygen concentration in the implant group (P=0.001).
 
 
Oxygen Producing Implant<br /> The device consists of hollow dialysis membranes, each filled with oxygen producing Synechococcus cyanobacteria, and then capped on each end with silicone. The membranes allow the passage of small molecules such as oxygen, carbon dioxide, and sugars, but restrict passage of cells.
 
Oxygen Producing Implant<br /> The device consists of hollow dialysis membranes, each filled with oxygen producing Synechococcus cyanobacteria, and then capped on each end with silicone. The membranes allow the passage of small molecules such as oxygen, carbon dioxide, and sugars, but restrict passage of cells.

 
×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×