June 2015
Volume 56, Issue 7
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2015
Association between subretinal drusenoid deposits (SDD) seen by multimodal imaging and dark adaptation (DA) in normal, early, and intermediate age-related macular degeneration (AMD) eyes
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • David Neely
    UAB Department of Ophthalmology, UAB Callahan Eye Hospital, Birmingham, AL
  • Anna V Zarubina
    UAB Department of Ophthalmology, UAB Callahan Eye Hospital, Birmingham, AL
  • Mark E Clark
    UAB Department of Ophthalmology, UAB Callahan Eye Hospital, Birmingham, AL
  • Carrie E Huisingh
    UAB Department of Ophthalmology, UAB Callahan Eye Hospital, Birmingham, AL
  • Gregory R Jackson
    MacuLogix, Hummelstown, PA
  • Gerald McGwin
    UAB Department of Ophthalmology, UAB Callahan Eye Hospital, Birmingham, AL
  • Christine A Curcio
    UAB Department of Ophthalmology, UAB Callahan Eye Hospital, Birmingham, AL
  • Cynthia Owsley
    UAB Department of Ophthalmology, UAB Callahan Eye Hospital, Birmingham, AL
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships David Neely, AdaptDx (P), maculogix (S); Anna Zarubina, None; Mark Clark, None; Carrie Huisingh, None; Gregory Jackson, MacuLogix (E), MacuLogix (I), MacuLogix (P); Gerald McGwin, None; Christine Curcio, None; Cynthia Owsley, AdaptDx (P)
  • Footnotes
    Support None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2015, Vol.56, 2777. doi:https://doi.org/
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      David Neely, Anna V Zarubina, Mark E Clark, Carrie E Huisingh, Gregory R Jackson, Gerald McGwin, Christine A Curcio, Cynthia Owsley; Association between subretinal drusenoid deposits (SDD) seen by multimodal imaging and dark adaptation (DA) in normal, early, and intermediate age-related macular degeneration (AMD) eyes. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2015;56(7 ):2777. doi: https://doi.org/.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract
 
Purpose
 

Delayed rod-mediated DA is characteristic of early AMD and some older adults in normal macular health. The delay is attributed to poor retinoid translocation from choriocapillaris to photoreceptors due to a physical barrier in aged Bruch’s membrane and unknown factors in RPE. SDD are extracellular lesions that confer risk for AMD progression independently from drusen. SDD may impose a further barrier in the subretinal space plus inflict direct toxicity on cells. We examined the association between SDD identified by multimodal retinal imaging and DA in older eyes in normal macular health or with early or intermediate AMD.

 
Methods
 

Subjects enrolled in the Alabama Study on Age-Related Macular Degeneration (ALSTAR) study were assessed for the presence of SDD using color fundus photos, IR and AF images, and SD-OCT volumes (Zarubina et al. abstract submitted). AMD severity was determined using the AREDS 9-step scale for color fundus photographs. Rod-mediated DA was measured for one eye of each subject following a photobleach using a computer-automated dark adaptometer with targets centered at 5° on the superior retinal vertical meridian; thresholds were measured for 20 minutes post-bleach. Speed of DA was characterized by the rod-intercept, defined as the duration (minutes) required for sensitivity to recover to a criterion value that is in the latter half of the second component of rod recovery.

 
Results
 

Both multimodal SDD identification and DA testing were completed on one eye of 547 participants aged 60-92 years old (Mean age 69). Of these 76% were in normal macular health, 23% had early AMD, and 2% intermediate AMD. For the total sample, mean rod intercept was greater for eyes with SDD (n=139) vs. no SDD (n=408) (M 14.9 vs. 11.4 min, p<0.0001, age-adjusted p=0.002). For those with AMD, eyes with SDD (n=69) had greater rod-intercepts than those without SDD (n=65) (M 17.2 vs. 12.7 min, p=0.017, age-adjusted p=0.098; Figure). For normal eyes, the rod-intercept did not differ between eyes with (N=70) and without SDD (N=343) (M 11.6 vs. 11.1 min, p=0.49, age-adjusted p=0.993).

 
Conclusions
 

Findings suggest that SDD as determined by multimodal imaging in AMD is associated with slowed rod-mediated DA as compared to those AMD eyes without SDD.  

 
Slower DA in Eyes with SDD
 
Slower DA in Eyes with SDD

 
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