June 2015
Volume 56, Issue 7
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2015
OCT Angiography (OCTA) in Healthy Human Subjects
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jack Yi
    USC Eye Institute, Keck School of Medicine of USC, Los Angeles, CA
  • Douglas Matsunaga
    USC Eye Institute, Keck School of Medicine of USC, Los Angeles, CA
  • John Edward Legarreta
    Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL
  • Andrew Dominic Legarreta
    Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL
  • Giovanni Gregori
    Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL
  • Mary K Durbin
    Advanced Development, Carl Zeiss Meditec, Inc., Dublin, CA
  • Utkarsh Sharma
    Advanced Development, Carl Zeiss Meditec, Inc., Dublin, CA
  • Philip J Rosenfeld
    Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL
  • Carmen A Puliafito
    USC Eye Institute, Keck School of Medicine of USC, Los Angeles, CA
  • Amir H. Kashani
    USC Eye Institute, Keck School of Medicine of USC, Los Angeles, CA
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships Jack Yi, Carl Zeiss Meditec (F); Douglas Matsunaga, Carl Zeiss Meditec (F); John Legarreta, Carl Zeiss Meditec (F); Andrew Legarreta, Carl Zeiss Meditec (F); Giovanni Gregori, Carl Zeiss Meditec (F); Mary Durbin, Carl Zeiss Meditec (E); Utkarsh Sharma, Carl Zeiss Meditec (E); Philip Rosenfeld, Carl Zeiss Meditec (F); Carmen Puliafito, Carl Zeiss Meditec (F); Amir Kashani, Carl Zeiss Meditec (F)
  • Footnotes
    Support None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2015, Vol.56, 3318. doi:https://doi.org/
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      Jack Yi, Douglas Matsunaga, John Edward Legarreta, Andrew Dominic Legarreta, Giovanni Gregori, Mary K Durbin, Utkarsh Sharma, Philip J Rosenfeld, Carmen A Puliafito, Amir H. Kashani; OCT Angiography (OCTA) in Healthy Human Subjects. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2015;56(7 ):3318. doi: https://doi.org/.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract
 
Purpose
 

To evaluate the feasibility of noninvasive retinal angiography using a prototype using swept-source (SS) and spectral-domain (SD) optical coherence tomography (OCT) angiography.

 
Methods
 

Data was acquired using a Cirrus (Carl Zeiss Meditec, Dublin, CA) SS-OCT and SD-OCT prototype angiography systems. Five healthy subjects (nine eyes) with no past ophthalmologic history were recruited. 3x3mm regions centered on the fovea, nasal macula, and temporal macula were imaged. Retinal vasculature was assessed in three horizontal slabs consisting of the inner, middle, and outer retina. The vasculature was reconstructed using an intensity-based algorithm into separate en face images. Post-processed en face OCT angiograms were analyzed with ImageJ (NIH, Bethesda, MD) to quantify the density of retinal microvasculature using the “Auto Local Threshold” plug-in (Landini G. v1.5).

 
Results
 

OCTA in healthy subjects resembled fine capillary networks that have been demonstrated in previous histological studies of human cadaver eyes. Retinal vessels were not visualized in the outer retina. Within the central macula and temporal macula, the inner retina displayed continuous capillaries traveling in the same retinal plane while the middle retinal slab contained a lattice pattern of vessels. The nasal macular region showed capillary segments radiating out from the optic disc in the inner retina while the middle retinal slab featured a lattice pattern of discontinuous vessel segments. Vessel density analyses using ImageJ are shown in Figures 1 and 2.

 
Conclusions
 

Noninvasive, high-resolution angiograms produced by OCTA show qualitatively similar vascular patterns to previous histological images of the retina. OCTA angiography can reliably and reproducibly image the fine capillary networks of the retina and may have a role in assessing the retinal microvasculature when conventional fluorescein angiography cannot be performed.  

 
Fig. 1. Vessel density analysis of the central macular region of a healthy subject yielded an average total density of 31.68% ± 1.15% in the inner retina and a density of 30.86% ± 1.20% in the middle retina.
 
Fig. 1. Vessel density analysis of the central macular region of a healthy subject yielded an average total density of 31.68% ± 1.15% in the inner retina and a density of 30.86% ± 1.20% in the middle retina.
 
 
Fig. 2. Vessel density analysis of the nasal macular region of a healthy subject yielded an average total density of 31.59% ± 1.40% in the inner retina and a density of 31.47% ± 1.62% in the middle retina.
 
Fig. 2. Vessel density analysis of the nasal macular region of a healthy subject yielded an average total density of 31.59% ± 1.40% in the inner retina and a density of 31.47% ± 1.62% in the middle retina.

 
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