June 2015
Volume 56, Issue 7
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2015
Fate of non-perfused vessels in ischemic retina
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Marcus Fruttiger
    UCL Institute of Ophthalmology, London, United Kingdom
  • Michael Powner
    UCL Institute of Ophthalmology, London, United Kingdom
  • Ryan Jones
    UCL Institute of Ophthalmology, London, United Kingdom
  • Weijen Tan
    UCL Institute of Ophthalmology, London, United Kingdom
  • Meidong Zhu
    Save Sight Institute, Sydney, NSW, Australia
  • Andrew Alexander Chang
    Sydney Retina Clinic and Day Surgery, Sydney, NSW, Australia
  • Dawn A Sim
    Moorfields Eye Hospital, London, United Kingdom
  • Pearse Andrew Keane
    NIHR Biomedical Research Centre for Ophthalmolgy, Moorfields Eye Hospital, London, United Kingdom
  • Adnan Tufail
    Moorfields Eye Hospital, London, United Kingdom
  • Catherine A Egan
    Moorfields Eye Hospital, London, United Kingdom
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships Marcus Fruttiger, Astra Zeneca (F), Novartis (F); Michael Powner, None; Ryan Jones, None; Weijen Tan, None; Meidong Zhu, None; Andrew Chang, None; Dawn Sim, None; Pearse Keane, None; Adnan Tufail, Alergan (C), Bayer (C), GSK (C), Novartis (C), Pfizer (C), Thrombogenics (C); Catherine Egan, None
  • Footnotes
    Support None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2015, Vol.56, 3332. doi:https://doi.org/
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    • Get Citation

      Marcus Fruttiger, Michael Powner, Ryan Jones, Weijen Tan, Meidong Zhu, Andrew Alexander Chang, Dawn A Sim, Pearse Andrew Keane, Adnan Tufail, Catherine A Egan; Fate of non-perfused vessels in ischemic retina. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2015;56(7 ):3332. doi: https://doi.org/.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose: Ischemic retinopathy is associated with several vision threating complications, such as neural atrophy, vascular leakage and neovascularisation. Traditionally ischemia has been assessed by fluorescein angiography, visualising perfused vessels. Although this method does not provide any information about non-perfused vessels, it is often assumed that vessels in ischemic areas regress. Here we aim to learn more about the longterm fate of non-perfused vessels in the retinal vasculature.

Methods: Optical coherence tomography (Avanti Angiovue SDOCT, Optovue, Inc. Fremont, CA, USA) was used to visualise perfusion as well as structural properties of the retinal vasculature in patients suffering from retinal vascular occlusions. In addition, post mortem tissue from a patient with long standing (6 years) central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO) was investigated, using immunohistochemistry on whole mount retina and paraffin sections to visualise blood vessel components and retinal cells.

Results: Comparing OCT angiography (based on speckle variance) with en-face OCT images from selected retinal layers revealed that in ischemic areas of the retina non-perfused, larger vessels could be detected as hyper reflective structures. Furthermore, analysis of the CRVO postmortem tissue revealed perfect preservation of the basement membrane from all retinal vessels, including capillaries. However, these non-perfused “vessels sleeves” did not contain endothelial cells or pericytes.

Conclusions: Our data suggests longterm preservation of vascular basement membrane in ischemic retina. This has implications for therapeutic approaches aiming to alleviate retinal ischemia via cell therapy.

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