June 2015
Volume 56, Issue 7
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2015
Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography (OCTA) of Choroidal Neovascularization
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Talisa de Carlo
    New England Eye Center, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA
    Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, and Research Laboratory of Electronics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA
  • Marco A Bonini Filho
    New England Eye Center, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA
    CAPES Foundation, Ministry of Education of Brazil, Brasilia, Brazil
  • Adam T Chin
    New England Eye Center, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA
  • Mehreen Adhi
    New England Eye Center, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA
    Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, and Research Laboratory of Electronics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA
  • Daniela Ferrara
    New England Eye Center, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA
  • Caroline R Baumal
    New England Eye Center, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA
  • Andre J Witkin
    New England Eye Center, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA
  • Elias Reichel
    New England Eye Center, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA
  • Jay S Duker
    New England Eye Center, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA
  • Nadia K Waheed
    New England Eye Center, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships Talisa de Carlo, None; Marco Bonini Filho, None; Adam Chin, None; Mehreen Adhi, None; Daniela Ferrara, None; Caroline Baumal, None; Andre Witkin, None; Elias Reichel, None; Jay Duker, Carl Zeiss Meditech, Inc. (F), EyeNetra (I), Hemera Biosciences, Inc. (I), Massachusetts Lions Eye Research Fund (F), Ophthotech Corp (I), Optovue, Inc. (F), Research to Prevent Blindness (F); Nadia Waheed, None
  • Footnotes
    Support None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2015, Vol.56, 3962. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      Talisa de Carlo, Marco A Bonini Filho, Adam T Chin, Mehreen Adhi, Daniela Ferrara, Caroline R Baumal, Andre J Witkin, Elias Reichel, Jay S Duker, Nadia K Waheed; Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography (OCTA) of Choroidal Neovascularization. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2015;56(7 ):3962.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract 
 
Purpose
 

To describe the characteristics as well as sensitivity and specificity of detection of choroidal neovascularization (CNV) on optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA) using spectral domain OCT (SD-OCT).

 
Methods
 

Patients who underwent OCTA using the prototype AngioVue OCTA system (Optovue, Inc, Fremont, CA) between August 2014 and October 2014 at New England Eye Center were assessed. Patients in whom CNV was identified on OCTA were evaluated to define the characteristics of CNV on OCTA: size using greatest linear dimension (GLD; small if < 1mm, medium if between 1mm and 2mm, large if > 2mm), appearance (well-circumscribed, poorly-circumscribed), and presence of subretinal and intraretinal fluid. Concurrently, an overlapping second cohort of patients who received same day OCTA and fluorescein angiography (FA) for suspected CNV was evaluated to estimate the sensitivity and specificity of OCTA in detecting CNV using FA as the ground truth.

 
Results
 

CNV was visualized on OCTA in 48 eyes. Thirty-one eyes had CNV associated with neovascular age-related macular degeneration. CNV size was small in 23% (7/31), medium in 42% (13/31), and large in 35% (11/31). Poorly-circumscribed vessels, subretinal fluid, and intraretinal fluid were each seen in 71% (22/31). Seven eyes had CNV associated with central serous chorioretinopathy. CNV size was small in 71% (5/7) and large in 29% (2/7). 71% (5/7) had well-circumscribed vessels, 86% (6/7) had subretinal fluid, and 14% (1/7) had intraretinal fluid. 30 eyes with OCTA and same-day FA were evaluated to determine the sensitivity and specificity of CNV detection on OCTA. Sensitivity was 50% (4/8) and specificity was 91% (20/22).

 
Conclusions
 

OCTA allows the clinician to non-invasively visualize CNV and may provide a method for identifying and guiding treatment of CNV. The specificity of CNV detection on OCTA compared with FA appears high. Future studies with larger sample sizes are needed to better elaborate on the sensitivity and specificity of CNV detection and illustrate clinical utility.  

 
(A) OCTA of CSCR. (B) OCTA of neovascular AMD. (C) OCTA of neovascular AMD.
 
(A) OCTA of CSCR. (B) OCTA of neovascular AMD. (C) OCTA of neovascular AMD.
 
 
(A-B) OCTA of multifocal choroiditis shows CNV and PED. (C-E) Increasing hyperfluorescence and pooling on FA. (F-G) OCTA two months after anti-VEGF shows CNV and PED decreased in size. (H-J) Mild hyperfluorescence stable throughout FA on the same follow-up day as F-G.<br />
 
(A-B) OCTA of multifocal choroiditis shows CNV and PED. (C-E) Increasing hyperfluorescence and pooling on FA. (F-G) OCTA two months after anti-VEGF shows CNV and PED decreased in size. (H-J) Mild hyperfluorescence stable throughout FA on the same follow-up day as F-G.<br />

 
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