March 2012
Volume 53, Issue 14
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   March 2012
Evaluation of Posterior Pole Folds by SLO/OCT and Multispectral Fundus Imaging
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Rustum Karanjia
    Ophthalmology, University of Ottawa Eye Institute, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
  • John M. Hamilton
    Ophthalmology, University of Ottawa Eye Institute, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
  • Brian C. Leonard
    Ophthalmology, University of Ottawa Eye Institute, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
  • Vivek Patel
    Ophthalmology, University of Ottawa Eye Institute, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
  • Stuart G. Coupland
    Ophthalmology, University of Ottawa Eye Institute, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  Rustum Karanjia, None; John M. Hamilton, Annidis Health Systems Corp. (C); Brian C. Leonard, Annidis Health Systems Corp. (C); Vivek Patel, None; Stuart G. Coupland, Annidis Health Systems Corp. (C)
  • Footnotes
    Support  University Medical Research Fund
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science March 2012, Vol.53, 793. doi:https://doi.org/
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      Rustum Karanjia, John M. Hamilton, Brian C. Leonard, Vivek Patel, Stuart G. Coupland; Evaluation of Posterior Pole Folds by SLO/OCT and Multispectral Fundus Imaging. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2012;53(14):793. doi: https://doi.org/.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract
 
Purpose:
 

SLO/OCT has been shown to be capable of imaging posterior pole folds. This imaging modality however does not always accurately distinguish betwen choroidal, chorioretinal, and retinal folds. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the ability of multispectral fundus imaging (MSI) to characterize posterior pole folds in comparison to SLO/OCT.

 
Methods:
 

Patients with posterior pole folds on clinical exam were identified in the Neuro-Ophthalmology and Retina subspecialty clinics at the Ottawa Eye Institute. Three dimensional color and red-free fundus photographs of the disc-macula were obtained using a retinal camera (Topcon TRC-50DX). OCT topographical T-Scans of the central 29 degrees along with horizontal and vertical B-Scans through the macula were obtained (OPKO Spectral OCT/SLO™). MSI of the central 41 degree field were obtained using wavelengths ranging from 450 nm to 900 nm and a stacked set of images from the retina through to the choroid was generated. (Annidis Retinal Health Analyzer). Images were analyzed by staff Neuro-ophthalmologist, Clinical Electro-physiologist and Retina Specialist. Each set of images was graded for the presence or absence of folds and the layer of the folds.

 
Results:
 

Thirteen eyes of ten patients with presumed folds on clinical examination were identified for this study. Five eyes demonstrated chorioretinal folds on both SLO/OCT and MSI. Four eyes had retinal folds without choroidal folds on both SLO/OCT and MSI. Two eyes showed choroidal folds on both SLO/OCT and MSI. Another two eyes showed choroidal folds on MSI with no apparent folds on SLO/OCT.

 
Conclusions:
 

SLO/OCT and MSI are valuable methods for examining posterior pole folds. However SLO/OCT was not able to identify presence of posterior pole folds in all subjects. MSI is a useful adjunct to imaging these folds and determining their anatomical location. This study represents the largest collection of SLO/OCT and MSI data for patients with posterior pole folds.

 
Keywords: imaging methods (CT, FA, ICG, MRI, OCT, RTA, SLO, ultrasound) • imaging/image analysis: clinical • retina 
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