April 2011
Volume 52, Issue 14
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   April 2011
Gene Therapy To Rescue Splice Defects In Eye Diseases Using U1 snRNA
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • John Neidhardt
    Institute of Medical Molecular Genetics, University of Zurich, Schwerzenbach, Switzerland
  • Fabian Schmid
    Institute of Medical Molecular Genetics, University of Zurich, Schwerzenbach, Switzerland
  • Esther Glaus
    Institute of Medical Molecular Genetics, University of Zurich, Schwerzenbach, Switzerland
  • Romain Da Costa
    Institute of Medical Molecular Genetics, University of Zurich, Schwerzenbach, Switzerland
  • Wolfgang Berger
    Institute of Medical Molecular Genetics, University of Zurich, Schwerzenbach, Switzerland
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  John Neidhardt, None; Fabian Schmid, None; Esther Glaus, None; Romain Da Costa, None; Wolfgang Berger, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  Velux Foundation and Research Foundation of the University of Zurich
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science April 2011, Vol.52, 485. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      John Neidhardt, Fabian Schmid, Esther Glaus, Romain Da Costa, Wolfgang Berger; Gene Therapy To Rescue Splice Defects In Eye Diseases Using U1 snRNA. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2011;52(14):485.

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Abstract

Purpose: : Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) initially affects the mid-peripheral retina and ultimately causes severe visual impairment. The disease is associated with mutations in over 40 different genes. Frequently, screening of affected families reveals splice site mutations as the cause of the disease. Here, we evaluate a gene therapy to correct splice defects in two patient-derived cell lines from independent families.

Methods: : We performed linkage in a large consanguine RP family and candidate sequencing in a five generation family showing X-chromosomal RP. Sequencing and RT-PCR was used to identify the causative mutations and to analyze transcripts. The complementarity of the U1 snRNA (U1) to the mutated splice donor site (SDS) was increased by site directed mutagenesis. Primary skin fibroblasts were cultured from affected and unaffected family members and transduced with lentiviral particles containing U1.

Results: : The two novel splice donor site mutations c.1245+3A>T and c.479G>A were identified in the ciliary genes of RPGR and BBS1, respectively, and found to cosegregate with the disease of RP. Both mutations cause splice defects. Affected family members show late-onset forms of RP without additional clinical features. In agreement with these mild phenotypes, we did not detect obvious ciliary defects in patient-derived cell lines.To correct the splice defect, we developed a gene therapeutic approach using mutation-adapted U1. U1 is required for SDS recognition of pre-mRNAs and initiates the splice process. The two RP mutations interfere with the recognition of the SDS by U1. To overcome the deleterious effects of the mutations, we generated four U1 isoforms with increasing complementarity to the SDS. Lentiviral particles were used to transduce patient-derived fibroblasts with these U1 variants. Full complementarity of U1 partially corrects the splice defects and selectively increases recognition of the mutated SDS. The therapeutic effect is dose dependent.

Conclusions: : U1-based gene therapy constitutes a promising technology to treat SDS mutations in inherited diseases including autosomal recessive and X-linked RP. The technique might be applicable to many inherited gene defects.

Keywords: gene transfer/gene therapy • retinal degenerations: hereditary • genetics 
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