April 2011
Volume 52, Issue 14
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   April 2011
The Effect of Introduction of iCare Tonometer in the Pediatric Ophthalmology Clinic on Number of Examinations Under Anesthesia
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Florin Grigorian
    Ophthalmology, University of Missouri Kansas City, Kansas City, Missouri
  • Adriana P. Grigorian
    Ophthalmology, Children's Mercy Hospital, Kansas City, Missouri
  • Scott Olitsky
    Ophthalmology, Children's Mercy Hospital, Kansas City, Missouri
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  Florin Grigorian, None; Adriana P. Grigorian, None; Scott Olitsky, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science April 2011, Vol.52, 679. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      Florin Grigorian, Adriana P. Grigorian, Scott Olitsky; The Effect of Introduction of iCare Tonometer in the Pediatric Ophthalmology Clinic on Number of Examinations Under Anesthesia. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2011;52(14):679.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose: : To demonstrate that the introduction of iCare rebound tonometry in a pediatric ophthalmology clinic resulted in less need for performing examinations under anesthesia to evaluate glaucoma in children.

Methods: : Retrospective, comparative study of the numbers of EUA’s and office visits when IOP was checked in 3 time periods: before introduction of iCare rebound tonometer, during the learning period and after the rebound tonometry was well established. The EUA’s operative reports in these periods were reviewed. The number of EUA’s done to evaluate the IOP for glaucoma management was collected. The clinic visits of patients with diagnosis of glaucoma were reviewed and the visits when IOP was recorded were collected.

Results: : 87 patients were enrolled. 49 patients met criteria in the first period and 58 in the third period. The average age for the first period was 4.2 years, and for the third period was 4.9 years (P-value=0.3). The numbers of EUA performed before and after the introduction of iCare was 58 and 19 respectively (P-value=0.0002). The number of office visits when IOP was measured increased from 37 to 151. The middle period has intermediate data and suggests a trend and also a short learning period.

Conclusions: : The use of iCare tonometry decreased the need of EUA to evaluate children with glaucoma. This decrease not only limits the need for general anesthesia in young children but increases operating room efficiency for the surgeon and families.

Keywords: clinical (human) or epidemiologic studies: outcomes/complications • intraocular pressure 
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