April 2011
Volume 52, Issue 14
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   April 2011
Intraindividual Comparison Of The Influence Of Aerobic And Resistance Exercise On The Intraocular Pressure In Healthy Subjects
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Florian Rufer
    Ophthalmology,
    University of Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel, Germany
  • Johanna Schiller
    University of Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel, Germany
  • Alexa Klettner
    Ophthalmology,
    University of Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel, Germany
  • Johann Roider
    Ophthalmology,
    University of Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel, Germany
  • Burkhard Weisser
    University of Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel, Germany
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  Florian Rufer, None; Johanna Schiller, None; Alexa Klettner, None; Johann Roider, None; Burkhard Weisser, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science April 2011, Vol.52, 686. doi:
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      Florian Rufer, Johanna Schiller, Alexa Klettner, Johann Roider, Burkhard Weisser; Intraindividual Comparison Of The Influence Of Aerobic And Resistance Exercise On The Intraocular Pressure In Healthy Subjects. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2011;52(14):686.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose: : Aerobic exercise leads to a known decrease of the intraocular pressure (IOP). For resistance training, both decrease and increase of the IOP have been reported. In the current study, the influence of aerobic exercise and resistance exercise of the upper and lower limb on the IOP were compared intraindividually.

Methods: : 21 healthy subjects (11 m., 10 f., mean age 26 ± 3.4 years) were included. The mean body mass index was 23.1 ± 2.2. Aerobic exercises were performed for 30 minutes using a bicycle ergometer, keeping the heart rate ≥ 170 bpm. The IOP was measured in both eyes at baseline, after 10, 20 and 30 minutes during the exercise and 10 minutes after, using rebound tonometry. After a ≥24h break, resistance exercises with a leg curl machine and a pec deck followed. At each machine, 20 repetitions with an intensity of 65% of the individual maximum power and 10 repetitions with 75% of the maximum power were completed. The patients were asked to breathe regularly to prevent a Valsalva maneuver. Between the different resistance exercises was a break of 30 minutes, the order was randomized. The IOP was measured directly at the beginning and at the end of the resistance exercises, and after 10 minutes recreation.

Results: : Before aerobic exercise, the mean baseline IOP was 18.8 ± 2.7 mmHg. It was 16.5 ± 2.8 mmHg after 10, 17.1 ± 2.6 after 20 and 16.7 ± 3.3 after 30 minutes of exercising. After 10 minutes of recreation, the IOP recovered to baseline level (18.8 ± 2.7 mmHg). The mean IOP before resistance exercise with the leg curl machine was 17.0 ± 3.0 mmHg (65% power) and 16.8 ± 3.3 mmHg (75% power) and did not change significantly during the experiment. The mean IOP before resistance exercise with the pec deck (65% power) was 16.4 ± 2.6 mmHg and increased to 17.2 ± 2.6 mmHg, which was significant (p < 0.05). After 10 minutes of recreation it recovered to 16.3 ± 2.7 mmHg. At 75% power, the mean baseline IOP was 16.3 ± 2.5 mmHg, there were no significant changes.

Conclusions: : While aerobic exercise at a heart rate of 170 bpm leads to significant decrease of the IOP, there was nearly no influence of resistance exercise as long as a Valsalva maneuver was prevented. There was no major difference between resistance exercise of the upper and of the lower limb.

Keywords: intraocular pressure • stress response • clinical (human) or epidemiologic studies: treatment/prevention assessment/controlled clinical trials 
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