April 2011
Volume 52, Issue 14
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   April 2011
Avascular Retina Posterior to Previously Treated Retina in Familial Exudative Vitreoretinopathy
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Lisa J. Faia
    Ophthalmology, Associated Retinal Consultants, Royal Oak, Michigan
  • Michael T. Trese
    Ophthalmology, Associated Retinal Consultants, Royal Oak, Michigan
  • Antonio Capone, Jr.
    Ophthalmology, Associated Retinal Consultants, Royal Oak, Michigan
  • Kimberly A. Drenser
    Ophthalmology, Associated Retinal Consultants, Royal Oak, Michigan
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  Lisa J. Faia, None; Michael T. Trese, None; Antonio Capone, Jr., None; Kimberly A. Drenser, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science April 2011, Vol.52, 1588. doi:
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      Lisa J. Faia, Michael T. Trese, Antonio Capone, Jr., Kimberly A. Drenser; Avascular Retina Posterior to Previously Treated Retina in Familial Exudative Vitreoretinopathy. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2011;52(14):1588.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract
 
Purpose:
 

To describe the findings of avascular retina posterior to previously treated retina seen in children with familial exudative vitreoretinopathy (FEVR) after laser treatment.

 
Methods:
 

Children with FEVR who required further laser treatment due to new areas of avascular retina and dropout posterior to prior laser treatment were reviewed.

 
Results:
 

Five eyes of four infants were included. All infants were full term with uncomplicated pregnancies except for one baby with intrauterine growth restriction. There were two male and two female infants. Three eyes were stage 3 and two eyes were stage 2. All patients underwent examination under anesthesia and fluorescein angiography. Fundus examination did not reveal frank exudate or neovascularization. Interestingly, on fluorescein angiography, all eyes were shown to have areas of dropout and vascular irregularities posterior to previously treated laser not obvious on clinical exam (illustrated by the areas in the black ovals below).

 
Conclusions:
 

Patients with FEVR can have devastating results if areas of avascular retina are not treated promptly. Clinical examinations alone may not be enough for proper follow up and evaluation of FEVR. Fluorescein angiograms may be necessary for full assessment. The findings of avascular retina posteriorly may also cause us to rethink the growth pattern of the eye.  

 
Keywords: retina • neovascularization • retinal development 
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