April 2011
Volume 52, Issue 14
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   April 2011
LEA/Random Dot E Versus the Plus Optix Device: Which System Provides the Best Referral When Screening Preschool Children?
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Joannah M. Vaughan
    Ophthalmology, Casey Eye Institute, OHSU, Portland, Oregon
  • Allison Summers
    Ophthalmology, Casey Eye Institute, OHSU, Portland, Oregon
  • Lan Hoang
    Ophthalmology, Casey Eye Institute, OHSU, Portland, Oregon
  • Talitha Dale
    Ophthalmology, Casey Eye Institute, OHSU, Portland, Oregon
  • Alex Choy
    Ophthalmology, Casey Eye Institute, OHSU, Portland, Oregon
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  Joannah M. Vaughan, None; Allison Summers, None; Lan Hoang, None; Talitha Dale, None; Alex Choy, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  Oregon State Elks Association
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science April 2011, Vol.52, 1600. doi:
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      Joannah M. Vaughan, Allison Summers, Lan Hoang, Talitha Dale, Alex Choy; LEA/Random Dot E Versus the Plus Optix Device: Which System Provides the Best Referral When Screening Preschool Children?. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2011;52(14):1600.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose: : Which screening method provides the most accurate referral for preschool children ages 3-5?

Methods: : Five hundred and six children were screened using the LEA distance test in combination with the Random Dot E stereopsis test. These same children were then rescreened using the Plus Optix screening device. Of the subjects available on the clinic date and for whom consent for the second portion of the study could be obtained, one hundred who passed both screening methods were randomly selected and all who failed either screening methodology were selected. All 200 children in this portion of the study were given a comprehensive dilated eye exam. These exams were administered at the Head Starts by pediatric ophthalmologists and optometrists all using the same exam methodology.

Results: : Sixty-eight eye exams have been analyzed so far. Based on our initial analysis of these 68 dilated eye exams, the LEA method correctly referred 82.89% of the time, and the Plus Optix correctly referred 82.92% of the time. The remaining 132 dilated eye exams will be analyzed to determine how many correct referrals each system generated and how many children were missed by either of these screening methods.

Conclusions: : There is a perception that the Plus Optix screening device is more accurate than the LEA/Random Dot E screening system. Sometimes the two screening methods do not agree on the screening results. This is primarily because the Plus Optix device, when using the factory default settings, over-refers for astigmatism. When given a dilated eye exam, the Plus Optix referrals based on astigmatism referrals were not prescribed treatment, but were given the diagnosis, "monitor and return in 1 year." The LEA system when coupled with the Random Dot E test was found to be an accurate screening device. Settings on the Plus Optix system should be adjusted to prevent over referrals for astigmatism.

Keywords: amblyopia • strabismus: diagnosis and detection • visual development: infancy and childhood 
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