April 2011
Volume 52, Issue 14
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   April 2011
Efficacy and Safety of Long-term Use of Steroid Eyedrops Following Penetrating Keratoplasty; A Prospective, Randomized Study
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jun Shimazaki
    Department of Ophthalmology, Tokyo Dental College, Ichikawa, Japan
    Department of Ophthalmology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan
  • Seika Den
    Department of Ophthalmology, Tokyo Dental College, Ichikawa, Japan
  • Ayumi Harashima
    Department of Ophthalmology, Tokyo Dental College, Ichikawa, Japan
    Ophthalmology, St. Luke’s International Hospital, Tokyo, Japan
  • Yoshiyuki Satake
    Department of Ophthalmology, Tokyo Dental College, Ichikawa, Japan
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  Jun Shimazaki, None; Seika Den, None; Ayumi Harashima, None; Yoshiyuki Satake, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science April 2011, Vol.52, 1633. doi:
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Jun Shimazaki, Seika Den, Ayumi Harashima, Yoshiyuki Satake; Efficacy and Safety of Long-term Use of Steroid Eyedrops Following Penetrating Keratoplasty; A Prospective, Randomized Study. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2011;52(14):1633.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Purpose: : To investigate the efficacy and safety of the long-term use of steroid eyedrops following penetrating keratoplasty in a prospective, randomized study.

Methods: : Patients underwent penetrating keratoplasty and maintained the graft clarity for more than 1 year with the use of steroid eyedrops were randomly assigned to; use 0.1%fluoromethorone eyedrops t.i.d. (steroid group, n=19) or discontinue steroid eyedrops (no steroid group, n=19). They were followed-up for more than one year. Graft clarity, development of immunological rejection, best spectacle corrected visual acuity (BSCVA), intraocular pressure, epithelial damage, conjunctival culture, and other complications were monitored prospectively.

Results: : No differences were noted with regard to age, gender, original diseases between the two groups. Four eyes in the steroid group were dropped out from the study because of the suture break (n=2), intraocular pressure rise (n=1), and discontinuation of steroids due to self-judgment (n=1). Six eyes in the no steroid group were dropped out due to suture break (n=3), retinal detachment (n=1), self-judgment (n=1), and patent’s death (n=1). At one-year follow-up, graft clarity rate was not significantly different (100% in steroid group and 85% in the no steroid group, P=0.21). However, the incidence of rejection was significantly higher in the no steroid group (46%) than steroid group (46% vs. 7%, P=0.016). Two eyes in the no steroid group showed irreversible endothelial decompensation following rejection. No significant differences were noted in BSCVA, intraocular pressure, and epithelial damage grading at the one-year follow-up. Although one eye in the steroid group showed intraocular pressure rise, it returned to normal after discontinuation of the steroid. Three eyes in the steroid group showed positive conjunctival culture, however, no infection signs were noted.

Conclusions: : Long-term use of steroid eyedrops (0.1% fluoromethorone t.i.d.) was effective for the suppression of rejection even more than 1 year after keratoplasty.

Clinical Trial: : http://www.umin.ac.jp/ctr/, R000004618

Keywords: cornea: clinical science • corticosteroids • transplantation 
×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×