April 2011
Volume 52, Issue 14
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   April 2011
Relation Between Variations In Posterior Vitreous Detachments And Visual Prognoses In Epiretinal Membranes
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Akihiro Kakehashi
    Ophthalmology, Saitama Med Ctr/Jichi Med Univ, Saitama, Japan
  • Ayumi Ohta
    Ophthalmology, Saitama Med Ctr/Jichi Med Univ, Saitama, Japan
  • Fumihiko Toyoda
    Ophthalmology, Saitama Med Ctr/Jichi Med Univ, Saitama, Japan
  • Nozomi Kinoshita
    Ophthalmology, Saitama Med Ctr/Jichi Med Univ, Saitama, Japan
  • Hiroko Yamagami
    Ophthalmology, Saitama Med Ctr/Jichi Med Univ, Saitama, Japan
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  Akihiro Kakehashi, None; Ayumi Ohta, None; Fumihiko Toyoda, None; Nozomi Kinoshita, None; Hiroko Yamagami, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science April 2011, Vol.52, 2156. doi:
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Akihiro Kakehashi, Ayumi Ohta, Fumihiko Toyoda, Nozomi Kinoshita, Hiroko Yamagami; Relation Between Variations In Posterior Vitreous Detachments And Visual Prognoses In Epiretinal Membranes. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2011;52(14):2156.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Purpose: : To clarify the relation between variations in posterior vitreous detachments (PVDs) and visual prognoses in epiretinal membranes (ERMs).

Methods: : We observed variations in PVDs in eyes of 37 patients (mean age, 65.7±11.0 years) with ERMs and observed them for 2 years. The PVD variations were classified into three groups biomicroscopically: no PVD, complete PVD (CPVD), and partial PVD with persistent vitreous attachment to the macula through the premacular hole of the posterior hyaloid membrane (PPVD). The best-corrected visual acuity was measured and converted to the logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution (BCVA logMAR) value at the first visit and 2 years later.

Results: : We observed no PVD in 16 of 37 eyes (mean, 61.3±11.3 years), CPVD in 11 of 37 eyes (mean, 69.1±9.9 years), and PPVD in 10 of 37 eyes (mean, 69.3±10.9 years) at the first visit; each type has unchanged for 2 years. The logMAR VA at the first visit was worst in the PPVD group (0.22±0.35) compared with the no-PVD (-0.019 ±0.07) (p<0.01) and CPVD groups (0.029±0.08) (p<0.05). The logMAR BCVA 2 years later was also worst in the PPVD group (0.39±0.35) compared with the no-PVD (0.04±0.13) (p<0.05) and CPVD groups (0.03±0.09) (p<0.05). The logMAR BCVA change over 2 years was worst in the PPVD group (0.17±0.23) compared with the no-PVD (0.06±0.14) (p<0.05) and CPVD groups (0.0009±0.09) (p<0.05).

Conclusions: : ERMs with PPVD had a worse visual prognosis than ERMs with no PVD and CPVD. Chronic vitreous traction may cause the poor prognosis in ERMs. Correct diagnosis of variations in PVD is important for evaluating visual prognosis and for surgical indications.

Keywords: macula/fovea • vitreous • retina 
×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×