April 2011
Volume 52, Issue 14
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   April 2011
Neonatal Septicemia Is a Risk Factor for the Progression of Retinopathy of Prematurity
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Ankit Mehta
    New York Medical College, Valhalla, New York
  • Paul Lagonigro
    New York Medical College, Valhalla, New York
  • David Isaacs
    New York Medical College, Valhalla, New York
  • Emerson Que
    New York Medical College, Valhalla, New York
  • Shree Kurup
    Wake Forest University, Winston Salem, North Carolina
  • Danny H.-Kauffmann Jokl
    New York Medical College, Valhalla, New York
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  Ankit Mehta, None; Paul Lagonigro, None; David Isaacs, None; Emerson Que, None; Shree Kurup, None; Danny H.-Kauffmann Jokl, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science April 2011, Vol.52, 3450. doi:
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      Ankit Mehta, Paul Lagonigro, David Isaacs, Emerson Que, Shree Kurup, Danny H.-Kauffmann Jokl; Neonatal Septicemia Is a Risk Factor for the Progression of Retinopathy of Prematurity. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2011;52(14):3450.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose: : To search for risk factors to explain an asymmetric progression of ROP in genetically similar neonates.

Methods: : The serologic data and clinical course of two sets of monozygotic twins designated A,B and C,D and one set of triplets (E,F,G) were assessed and correlated with the course of ROP and, where appropriate, statistical significance was calculated.

Results: : 1. All seven of seven neonates (100%) had culture proven septicemia. 2. Five of seven (70%) had progression of ROP requiring surgery - laser for three of seven (43%), vitrectomy for two of seven (30%). 3. No correlation of APGAR scores, PEEP settings, serum potassium, white blood cell counts, and oxygen saturations to ROP progression was found. A genetic propensity to ROP progression could not be shown. 4. Progression to Stage 4 ROP (requiring vitrectomy) was noted in one twin (50%) of each of two twin sets (2 of 4) due to C. parapsillosis in twin B and S. epidermidis in twin C. Their respective siblings,A and D, progressed to threshold with plus disease requiring laser. Twin A had S. epidermidis sepicemia while twin D grew C. parapsillosis.One triplet, F, (33%) also progressed to threshold with plus disease requiring laser and grew out both E. fecalis and S. hominus. 5. The remaining two triplet siblings (67%) remained at zone 2, stage 2 despite septicemia due to Klebsiella and S.epidermidis in E and E. fecalis in G and both required no surgery.

Conclusions: : 1. Neonatal septicemia is a major risk factor for the progression of ROP. 2. The presence of septicemia demands frequent ophthalmic examinations to detect and manage progression of ROP.

Keywords: retinopathy of prematurity • bacterial disease 
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