April 2011
Volume 52, Issue 14
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   April 2011
Peripapillary Choroidal Thickness In Healthy Controls And Glaucoma Patients With Focal, Diffuse And Sclerotic Optic Disc Damage
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Marcelo T. Nicolela
    Ophthal and Visual Sciences, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada
  • Ken F. Roberts
    Ophthal and Visual Sciences, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada
  • Glen Sharpe
    Ophthal and Visual Sciences, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada
  • Alexandre S. Reis
    Ophthal and Visual Sciences, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada
  • Paul H. Artes
    Ophthal and Visual Sciences, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  Marcelo T. Nicolela, None; Ken F. Roberts, None; Glen Sharpe, None; Alexandre S. Reis, None; Paul H. Artes, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  CIHR Grant MOP-62783
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science April 2011, Vol.52, 3498. doi:
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      Marcelo T. Nicolela, Ken F. Roberts, Glen Sharpe, Alexandre S. Reis, Paul H. Artes; Peripapillary Choroidal Thickness In Healthy Controls And Glaucoma Patients With Focal, Diffuse And Sclerotic Optic Disc Damage. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2011;52(14):3498.

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Abstract
 
Purpose:
 

To examine peripapillary choroidal thickness in healthy controls and glaucoma patients with different patterns of optic disc damage.

 
Methods:
 

Healthy controls (n=92, mean age 56 years, range 45-67y) and glaucoma patients with focal (n=31; mean age 73 y, range 47-90 y; visual field MD -7.2 dB), diffuse (n=37; mean age 70 y, range 45-89 y; MD -4.2 dB) and sclerotic (n=34; mean age 76 y, range 57-91 y; MD -3.8 dB) optic disc damage were imaged with Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT, Spectralis, Heidelberg Engineering, 3.7 mm circular scan centred on optic nerve head). Global peripapillary choroidal thickness (PCT) was defined as the average distance between the automatically segmented retinal pigment epithelium/Bruch’s membrane and the manually outlined interface between posterior choroid and the anterior sclera.

 
Results:
 

The anterior border of the sclera was visible over more than 95% of the scan circumference in all but 6 subjects (2 controls, 4 patients). PCT was similar in healthy men and women (p=0.24) and decreased linearly with age (-12.5 µm / decade; p<0.001, r2=0.19; figure 1A), with a mean of 138 µm (at age 70, 95% prediction interval [PI], 61-215 µm). PCT was significantly thinner in glaucoma patients (p<0.001), with an average of 119 µm (at age 70, 95% PI, 53-186 µm). There was a small but statistically significant increase in PCT with visual field damage (2.3 µm/dB Mean Deviation, p=0.002, r2=0.11; figure 1B). In comparison to patients with diffuse optic disc damage, those with sclerotic and focal damage had thinner PCT (-26 µm, p<0.001; -12 µm, p=0.12, respectively).

 
Conclusions:
 

PCT decreases with age and is reduced in patients with glaucoma, particularly in those with sclerotic optic disc damage. The relationship between choroidal thickness and the severity of glaucomatous damage deserves further study.  

 
Keywords: choroid • blood supply • optic disc 
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