April 2011
Volume 52, Issue 14
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   April 2011
Reduced Retinal Function In Dark-Adaptation In Lewy Body Disease
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Guillaume Carcenac
    Universite de Montreal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
  • Céline Chayer
    Universite de Montreal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
  • Marie-Jeanne Kergoat
    Universite de Montreal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
  • Josée Filion
    Universite de Montreal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
  • Christian Bocti
    Universite de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Quebec, Canada
  • Alain Robillard
    Universite de Montreal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
  • Ron Postuma
    McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
  • Serge Gauthier
    McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
  • Hélène Kergoat
    Universite de Montreal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  Guillaume Carcenac, None; Céline Chayer, None; Marie-Jeanne Kergoat, None; Josée Filion, None; Christian Bocti, None; Alain Robillard, None; Ron Postuma, None; Serge Gauthier, None; Hélène Kergoat, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  Fondation Caroline-Durand, Fondation IUGM, COETF, FORMSAV, FÉS/ÉOUM
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science April 2011, Vol.52, 3524. doi:
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Guillaume Carcenac, Céline Chayer, Marie-Jeanne Kergoat, Josée Filion, Christian Bocti, Alain Robillard, Ron Postuma, Serge Gauthier, Hélène Kergoat; Reduced Retinal Function In Dark-Adaptation In Lewy Body Disease. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2011;52(14):3524.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Purpose: : Lewy Body Disease (LBD) is a form of dementia characterized by fluctuations in cognition, recurrent visual hallucinations, and parkinsonian motor disturbances. It is accompanied by a dysfunction in the cholinergic and dopaminergic systems. Our objective was to evaluate if retinal function was reduced in individuals with LBD considering that the human retina has acetylcholine and dopamine activity.

Methods: : Eleven healthy elderly subjects and twelve elderly individuals with LBD between 62 and 85 years of age participated in this study. The diagnosis of LBD was made by the referring neurologists and geriatricians based on published guidelines (McKeith et al 2005). The Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) score was measured on the day of testing. Scotopic flash electroretinograms (fERGs) and oscillatory potentials (OPs) were recorded from the test eye with a DTL-type electrode after pupillary dilation and a 20 minute dark-adaptation period. Data acquisition consisted of 3 trials of an average of 20, 100 msec epochs obtained after retinal stimulation with standard intensity white flashes (1.86 cd/m2/s) presented in a Ganzfeld bowl. The fERG amplitudes and implicit times were measured and averaged across subjects in each study group. Statistics consisted of ANOVAs for an alpha level of 0.05.

Results: : The MMSE scores were 30 ± 0 and 23.8 ± 1.0 for the control and LBD groups (p< 0.001), respectively. There were no significant changes in the fERG a- and b-wave and the OP implicit times between the 2 groups. However, the amplitude of the a- and b-wave was reduced by 28% (p= 0.024) and 25% (p= 0.011) respectively, in the LBD group. The amplitude of all 5 OPs was also reduced by more than 25% in the LBD group, with OP2 and OP3 reaching statistical significance (p< 0.0001).

Conclusions: : Our results indicate that LBD is accompanied by a reduction in the function of the photoreceptor and inner nuclear layers of the dark-adapted retina. These findings may suggest that the deficits in acetylcholine and dopamine known to occur in the brain of individuals with LBD are also present in the retina.

Keywords: aging • retina • electrophysiology: clinical 
×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×