April 2011
Volume 52, Issue 14
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   April 2011
Wide Field Retinal Imaging By Adaptive Optics Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscope
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kazuhiro Sasaki
    Computational Optics Group, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Japan
    Computational Optics and Ophthalmology Group, Tsukuba, Japan
  • Kazuhiro Kurokawa
    Computational Optics Group, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Japan
    Computational Optics and Ophthalmology Group, Tsukuba, Japan
  • Shuichi Makita
    Computational Optics Group, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Japan
    Computational Optics and Ophthalmology Group, Tsukuba, Japan
  • Daiki Tamada
    Computational Optics Group, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Japan
    Computational Optics and Ophthalmology Group, Tsukuba, Japan
  • Yiheng Lim
    Computational Optics Group, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Japan
    Computational Optics and Ophthalmology Group, Tsukuba, Japan
  • Barry Cense
    Computational Optics and Ophthalmology Group, Tsukuba, Japan
    Center for Optical Research & Education, Utsunomiya University, Utsunomiya, Japan
  • Yoshiaki Yasuno
    Computational Optics Group, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Japan
    Computational Optics and Ophthalmology Group, Tsukuba, Japan
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  Kazuhiro Sasaki, Topcon Corp. (F); Kazuhiro Kurokawa, Topcon Corp. (F); Shuichi Makita, Topcon Corp. (F); Daiki Tamada, Topcon Corp. (F); Yiheng Lim, Topcon Corp. (F); Barry Cense, Topcon Corp. (F); Yoshiaki Yasuno, Topcon Corp. (F)
  • Footnotes
    Support  Research Grant from Japan Science and Technology Agency
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science April 2011, Vol.52, 4062. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      Kazuhiro Sasaki, Kazuhiro Kurokawa, Shuichi Makita, Daiki Tamada, Yiheng Lim, Barry Cense, Yoshiaki Yasuno; Wide Field Retinal Imaging By Adaptive Optics Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscope. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2011;52(14):4062.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract 
 
Purpose:
 

The area over which an adaptive optics system can be operated in the diffraction-limit, the so called isoplanatic patch, is sized to approximately 1.5 degree. This size of the isoplanatic patch limits the imaging area of an adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AO-SLO). This study aims at widening the field of view (FOV) of our AO-SLO without loss of lateral resolution by using a customized scanning protocol and successive signal processing.

 
Methods:
 

6 eyes of 3 normal subjects were scanned by a custom-made AO-SLO. The AO-SLO measures the aberrations of the eye by a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor (HASO32, Imagine Eyes) with a 840 nm beacon beam and dynamically cancels the aberration by a magnetic deformable mirror (Mirao52, Imagine Eyes). As the aberrations of the eye were canceled, ultra-high-resolution retinal images were acquired by an SLO scanner with a probe beam of 1.04 um wavelength. Wide field scanning was performed by changing the position of the imaging area sequentially. Each retinal patch corresponds to 1.49 degrees by 1.86 degrees FOV and the wide field scanning size corresponds to 1.84 degrees by 4.5 degrees. Acquired AO-SLO images were automatically aligned to generate a wide FOV montage using a phase correlation based image registration algorithm.

 
Results:
 

Photoreceptor cells were clearly observed with a field of view of 1.43 +/- 0.3 degrees by 2.9 +/- 0.2 degrees in 3 of 6 eyes, as shown in Figs. 1. In other measurement sessions we failed to obtain high-resolution retinal images because of vignetting, insufficient AO performance, or improper optical alignment.

 
Conclusions:
 

Photoreceptors were clearly observed within the new wide FOV. The AO closed loop was operated over the entire FOV, however, the residual field aberrations caused a degradation of the image quality at the edge of these images. This can be overcome with further improvements of AO performance.  

 
Keywords: photoreceptors • imaging/image analysis: clinical • imaging methods (CT, FA, ICG, MRI, OCT, RTA, SLO, ultrasound) 
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