April 2011
Volume 52, Issue 14
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   April 2011
Substantially Increased Risk Of Major Visually Impairing Eye Disease In Aging Latinos
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Yohko Murakami
    Ophthalmology, USC, Doheny Eye Institute, Los Angeles, California
  • Farzana Choudhury
    Ophthalmology, USC, Doheny Eye Institute, Los Angeles, California
  • Mina Torres
    Ophthalmology, USC, Doheny Eye Institute, Los Angeles, California
  • Stanley P. Azen
    Ophthalmology, USC, Doheny Eye Institute, Los Angeles, California
  • Rohit Varma
    Ophthalmology, USC, Doheny Eye Institute, Los Angeles, California
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  Yohko Murakami, None; Farzana Choudhury, None; Mina Torres, None; Stanley P. Azen, None; Rohit Varma, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  NEI U10-EY-11753, EY-03040, and an unrestricted grant from the Research to Prevent Blindness
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science April 2011, Vol.52, 4227. doi:https://doi.org/
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      Yohko Murakami, Farzana Choudhury, Mina Torres, Stanley P. Azen, Rohit Varma; Substantially Increased Risk Of Major Visually Impairing Eye Disease In Aging Latinos. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2011;52(14):4227. doi: https://doi.org/.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract
 
Purpose:
 

To determine the 4-year incidence of major visually impairing eye disease in adult Latinos in the Los Angeles Latino Eye Study (LALES).

 
Methods:
 

Population-based, longitudinal study investigating the 4-year incidence of major visually impairing eye disease, defined as the aggregate incidence of the following: open-angle glaucoma, ocular hypertension, age-related macular degeneration (AMD), diabetic retinopathy, lens opacity, and uncorrected refractive error. A comprehensive ophthalmic examination was performed on Latinos 40 years and older at baseline and at the 4-year follow-up, including IOP measurements, visual field testing, simultaneous stereoscopic optic disc and fundus photography, and assessments of presenting binocular visual acuity and best-corrected distance visual acuity in both eyes, using a standard Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy protocol. Photographs were graded using standardized protocols by masked graders. Glaucoma was determined by expert agreement of optic disc and visual field assessment. A modified Wisconsin Age-Related Maculopathy Grading System was used to estimate the incidence of AMD. Lens opacities were graded using a LOCS II grading at the slit lamp. Main outcome measures are 4-year incidence of aggregated major visually impairing conditions stratified by age.

 
Results:
 

Of the 4522 of 6100 participants (74%) who completed the follow-up examination, the 4-year incidence of aggregated major visually impairing eye disease was 19.7% (95% CI, 18.5-20.9%), or an average of 4.9%/year, based on 891 new cases. For individuals 50 and older, the average incidence was 26.6%, nearly triple that of those younger than 50 (9.7%, P < 0.0001). There were no gender-related differences in incidence.

 
Conclusions:
 

Given the near tripling in the incidence of aggregated major visually impairing eye disease in Latinos ≥ 50 years of age compared to those < 50 years of age, we recommend regular routine eye examinations and screening programs to reduce vision loss due to eye disease in aging Latinos.  

 
Keywords: clinical (human) or epidemiologic studies: prevalence/incidence • clinical (human) or epidemiologic studies: biostatistics/epidemiology methodology • clinical (human) or epidemiologic studies: risk factor assessment 
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