April 2011
Volume 52, Issue 14
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   April 2011
Health Pessimism and Vision Optimism among Black Participants in the Salisbury Eye Evaluation Study
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Mahmood El-Gasim
    Wilmer Eye Institute,
    Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
  • Beatriz Munoz
    Dana Center for Preventive Ophthalmology,
    Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
  • Sheila K. West
    Dana Center for Preventive Ophthalmology,
    Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
  • Adrienne W. Scott
    Wilmer Eye Institute,
    Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  Mahmood El-Gasim, None; Beatriz Munoz, None; Sheila K. West, None; Adrienne W. Scott, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  National Institute on Aging Grant AG02513. Dr. West is the recipient of a Senior Scientific Investigator award from Research to Prevent Blindness
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science April 2011, Vol.52, 4234. doi:
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      Mahmood El-Gasim, Beatriz Munoz, Sheila K. West, Adrienne W. Scott; Health Pessimism and Vision Optimism among Black Participants in the Salisbury Eye Evaluation Study. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2011;52(14):4234.

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Abstract

Purpose: : To examine the association between self-rated vision and visual acuity by race.

Methods: : Two thousand five hundred and twenty individuals, aged 65 to 84, including 666 Black participants and 1854 White participants from the Salisbury Eye Evaluation Study reported their self-rated vision score. Binocular visual acuity was assessed. Based on the level of visual acuity and the self-reported vision score, participants were placed into concordant and discrepant groups. Race specific Spearman correlation coefficients were calculated to estimate the strength of the association between the self-reported vision score and presenting binocular visual acuity. Age-adjusted multinomial logistic regression models were used to examine the characteristics associated with concordant and discrepant groups.

Results: : The Spearman correlation coefficient for the association between self-reported vision score and presenting visual acuity was -0.29 (95% confidence interval [CI], -0.24, -0.33) for White participants and -0.20 (95% CI, -0.12, -0.27) for Black participants. Being Black increased the odds more than two fold (odds ratio, 2.53; P=0.008) of being in the discrepant group that reported good vision but had a visual acuity worse than 20/40.

Conclusions: : Black participants in the SEE population were more likely than White participants to report good vision in spite of having poor visual acuity. Given the racial discrepancies, self-reported vision status should be used cautiously in surveillance surveys especially when assessing racial disparities in vision.

Keywords: clinical (human) or epidemiologic studies: prevalence/incidence • clinical (human) or epidemiologic studies: risk factor assessment • visual acuity 
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