April 2011
Volume 52, Issue 14
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   April 2011
Ease Of Cannulating Peripheral Veins In People With Macular Telangiectasia Type II
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Meidong Zhu
    Dept of Clinical Ophthalmology, Save Sight Institute, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia
    Lions New South Wales Eye Bank, Sydney/Sydney Eye Hospital, Sydney, Australia
  • Christine Gaston
    Dept of Clinical Ophthalmology, Save Sight Institute, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia
  • Daniel Barthelmes
    Dept of Clinical Ophthalmology, Save Sight Institute, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia
  • Mark C. Gillies
    Dept of Clinical Ophthalmology, Save Sight Institute, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  Meidong Zhu, None; Christine Gaston, None; Daniel Barthelmes, None; Mark C. Gillies, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  The Lowy Medical Research Institute
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science April 2011, Vol.52, 4525. doi:
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      Meidong Zhu, Christine Gaston, Daniel Barthelmes, Mark C. Gillies; Ease Of Cannulating Peripheral Veins In People With Macular Telangiectasia Type II. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2011;52(14):4525.

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Abstract

Purpose: : To investigate whether there is a significant difference in venous cannulation difficulty of people with macular telangiectasia type 2 (MacTel) compared with unaffected MacTel family members (MTF) and other patients with macular diseases (OTHER). Furthermore to study, if there is a difference, whether it is disease-related or due to other factors that may cause systemic vascular structure weakness.

Methods: : Venous cannulations were performed by two individual experienced medical staff on the three groups of the participants. The time taken for the individual cannulation was recorded. The degree of the difficulty including the numbers of attempts was recorded. Other factors that might have influenced ease of venous cannulation, including age, gender, hypertension and diabetic history, body mass index (BMI) and previous cancer treatment, were also analysed.

Results: : Thirty-six MacTel patients, 31 MTF members and 14 OTHER patients were included in the study. The time taken to perform venous cannulation were 10-300 seconds (median 25s with inter-quartile 16.25s, MacTel), 5-300 seconds (median 15s with inter-quartile 10s, MTF) and 5-40 seconds (median 10s with inter-quartile 10s, OTHER). Post-hoc test revealed significant differences between MacTel and MTF (P<0.05), MacTel and OTHER (P<0.01). There was no statistically significant difference between MTF and OTHER groups. Risk factor analysis indicated that only the age factor contributed to the difficulty of cannulation.

Conclusions: : Venous cannulation is more difficult in people with MacTel compared with the general population with macular disease. Gender, diabetes, history of cancer treatment and BMI did not contribute to the cannulation difficulty. These results suggest that people with MacTel type 2 may also have systemic vascular weakness.

Keywords: macula/fovea 
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