March 2012
Volume 53, Issue 14
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   March 2012
Improving Balance And Mobility In Older People With Vision Impairment: Protocol For A Randomized Controlled Trial
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Lisa J. Keay
    Injury Division,
    The George Institute for Global Health, Sydney, Australia
  • Michael Gleeson
    Injury Division,
    The George Institute for Global Health, Sydney, Australia
  • Cathie Sherrington
    Musculoskeletal Division,
    The George Institute for Global Health, Sydney, Australia
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  Lisa J. Keay, None; Michael Gleeson, None; Cathie Sherrington, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  ARC Post Doctoral Fellowship, APA Post Graduate scholarship, NHMRC Senior Research Fellowship
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science March 2012, Vol.53, 4414. doi:https://doi.org/
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      Lisa J. Keay, Michael Gleeson, Cathie Sherrington; Improving Balance And Mobility In Older People With Vision Impairment: Protocol For A Randomized Controlled Trial. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2012;53(14):4414. doi: https://doi.org/.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose: : Vision impairment is a growing public health problem in an ageing population, is an independent risk factor for falls, and compounds the effects of other risk factors by reducing mobility and physical fitness. This randomized controlled trial will investigate the effect of the Alexander Technique on balance and mobility in adults over 50 with vision impairments.

Methods: : 120 people over 50 years of age with vision impairments will participate in the trial. Participants will be independently mobile, with conversational English and no cognitive deficits. Data collectors will be masked to participant allocation. The intervention group will receive 12 home based lessons in the Alexander Technique on a weekly basis, and the control group will receive usual care.

Results: : Baseline assessments were completed on 120 participants with low vision. Outcome measures will be collected at 3 and 12 months post randomization. The primary outcome measure is physical ability using the 5 times sit to stand, standing balance and timed walking tests. Secondary outcome measures will be falls measured with 12 monthly calendars and fear of falling with the fall-related self-efficacy scale.

Conclusions: : If proven effective, the Alexander Technique will provide an additional modality to improve mobility and reduce falls risk in vulnerable adults with vision impairments.

Clinical Trial: : http://www.anzctr.org.au ACTRN12610000634077

Keywords: low vision • aging • quality of life 
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