March 2012
Volume 53, Issue 14
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   March 2012
Roles Of Macrophages And Dendritic Cells In Pathogenesis Of Vitreoretinal Diseases
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Koichi Nishitsuka
    Ophthalmology/Vis Sci,
    Yamagata University Sch of Med, Yamagata-shi, Japan
  • Mari Narumi
    Ophthalmology/Vis Sci,
    Yamagata University Sch of Med, Yamagata-shi, Japan
  • Toshinori Suzuki
    Yamagata University Hospital, Yamagata-shi, Japan
  • Mitsunori Yamakawa
    Diagnostic Pathology,
    Yamagata University Sch of Med, Yamagata-shi, Japan
  • Hidetoshi Yamashita
    Ophthalmology/Vis Sci,
    Yamagata University Sch of Med, Yamagata-shi, Japan
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  Koichi Nishitsuka, None; Mari Narumi, None; Toshinori Suzuki, None; Mitsunori Yamakawa, None; Hidetoshi Yamashita, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science March 2012, Vol.53, 4611. doi:https://doi.org/
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      Koichi Nishitsuka, Mari Narumi, Toshinori Suzuki, Mitsunori Yamakawa, Hidetoshi Yamashita; Roles Of Macrophages And Dendritic Cells In Pathogenesis Of Vitreoretinal Diseases. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2012;53(14):4611. doi: https://doi.org/.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose: : To clarify the roles of macrophages and dendritic cells in the pathogenesis of vitreoretinal disease, we investigated the vitreous cytology from patients.

Methods: : Among twenty-two patients underwent 23-gauge vitrectomy by a single surgeon (K.N), we defined the inflammatory group as the cases with clinically suspected inflammation in the vitreous cavity (16 eyes: 12 with retinal detachment, 4 with lens dislocation). The non-inflammatory group was defined as the cases without inflammation (6 eyes: 1 with macular hole, 2 with proliferative diabetic retinopathy, 3 with macular pucker). To collect the undiluted vitreous samples, a limited core pars plana vitrectomy without infusion was performed. We performed cytology with the samples using liquid-based-cytology (Surepath®) and performed HE and Papanicolau staining. Immunostaining for CD68 (macrophage marker) and DEC205 (pan-DC marker) were also performed and observed immunohistochemically.

Results: : In the inflammatory group, number of cells in the vitreous cavity was obviously bigger than non-inflammatory group (54.1 vs. 7.2/ x40 visual field, p=0.005). The migrated cells were mainly CD68+ and those cells contain pigment inside of their cytoplasm. Among those cells, DEC205+ cells were also observed. In cases of retinal detachment, there were CD68- cells and they also contain pigments in cytoplasm. In the Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease case, lymphocytes migration was observed.

Conclusions: : These results suggested that cell migration to the vitreous cavity have a possibility to play important roles in pathogenesis of vitreoretinal diseases. Not only inflammatory cells like macrophages and lymphocytes, but also dendritic cells migrate and may work as antigen presenting cells in the vitreous cavity. Different types of cells can migrate due to different pathophysiology of the diseases.

Keywords: retinal detachment • inflammation • vitreous 
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