March 2012
Volume 53, Issue 14
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   March 2012
Visual Performance and Optical Quality with Soft toric Contact Lenses and Rigid Gas Permeable Lenses in Keratoconus Patients
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Hema Radhakrishnan
    Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom
  • Amit N. Jinabhai
    Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom
    Aston University, Birmingham, United Kingdom
  • Clare O'Donnell
    Aston University, Birmingham, United Kingdom
    Optegra UK, Manchester, United Kingdom
  • Cindy Tromans
    Manchester Royal Eye Hospital, Manchester, United Kingdom
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  Hema Radhakrishnan, None; Amit N. Jinabhai, None; Clare O'Donnell, None; Cindy Tromans, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science March 2012, Vol.53, 4695. doi:https://doi.org/
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      Hema Radhakrishnan, Amit N. Jinabhai, Clare O'Donnell, Cindy Tromans; Visual Performance and Optical Quality with Soft toric Contact Lenses and Rigid Gas Permeable Lenses in Keratoconus Patients. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2012;53(14):4695. doi: https://doi.org/.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose: : To assess visual performance and higher-order ocular aberrations in keratoconic patients using toric soft contact lenses (SCL), rigid-gas-permeable (RGP) contact lenses and spectacle lens correction.

Methods: : Twenty-two keratoconus patients (16 RGP lens wearers and 6 spectacle wearers) were fitted with toric SCL. Ocular aberrations were measured with and without the patient’s habitual RGP lenses and with the SCL in place. In the spectacle wearers, aberrations were measured with and without the SCL. Visual performance (high- and low-contrast visual acuity) was evaluated with the patient’s habitual correction and with the SCL.

Results: : Both the habitual lenses and the toric SCL significantly reduced coma, trefoil, 3rd-order, 4th-order cylinder and higher-order root-mean-square (RMS) aberrations (p ≤ 0.015) in RGP lens wearers. In the spectacle wearers the toric SCL significantly reduced coma, 3rd-order and higher-order RMS aberrations (p ≤ 0.01). The patients’ habitual RGP lenses gave better low-contrast acuity (p ≤ 0.006) compared to the toric SCL; however, no significant difference was found between lens types for high-contrast acuity (p = 0.10). No significant differences in visual performance measurements were found between the patients’ spectacles and the toric SCL (p ≥ 0.06) in spectacle lens wearers.

Conclusions: : The results show that RGP lenses provided superior visual performances and greater reduction of 3rd-order aberrations compared to toric SCL in this group of keratoconic patients. In the spectacle-wearing group, visual performance with the toric SCL was found to be comparable to that measured with spectacles. Nonetheless, with the exception of spherical aberration, the toric SCL were successful in significantly reducing uncorrected higher-order aberrations.

Keywords: keratoconus • contact lens • aberrations 
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