April 2011
Volume 52, Issue 14
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   April 2011
Scleral Contact Lenses in the Management of Keratoconus and Corneal Transplant Patients
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Farid Afshar
    Moorfields Eye Hospital, London, United Kingdom
  • Ken W. Pullum
    Moorfields Eye Hospital, London, United Kingdom
  • Linda Ficker
    Moorfields Eye Hospital, London, United Kingdom
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  Farid Afshar, None; Ken W. Pullum, None; Linda Ficker, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science April 2011, Vol.52, 6522. doi:
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      Farid Afshar, Ken W. Pullum, Linda Ficker; Scleral Contact Lenses in the Management of Keratoconus and Corneal Transplant Patients. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2011;52(14):6522.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose: : To report our experience of scleral contact lenses in the management of keratoconus and corneal transplant (CT) patients.

Methods: : Retrospective review of 612 patients managed with scleral contact lenses (SCL) at Moorfields Eye hospital, United Kingdom.

Results: : There were 860 eyes of 612 patients included in the study. Mean age of patients was 56 years. 64.1% of patients were male. 77.7% of patients were post penetrating keratoplasty and 17.9% of patients had keratoconus. In the keratoconus group (n=160) the mean unaided visual acuity (VA) was 2/60 with 86.3% of patients recording VA ≤6/60. With SCL the mean VA improved to 6/11 with 75% patients achieving VA ≥6/12, and 23.8% achieving VA ≥6/6. In the CT group (n = 700) mean unaided VA was 3/60 with 81.9% patients recording VA ≤6/60. Mean VA improved to 6/10 with SCL with 81.9% achieving VA ≥6/12 and 37.9% achieving VA ≥6/6.

Conclusions: : Scleral contact lenses can lead to significant improvements in visual acuity and are a useful tool in the management of keratoconus and corneal transplant patients.

Keywords: contact lens • cornea: clinical science • keratoconus 
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