April 2011
Volume 52, Issue 14
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   April 2011
The Adaptation of the Tear Proteome to Extended Wear Contact Lenses
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Maria Markoulli
    Brien Holden Vision Institute, Sydney, Australia
    School of Optometry & Vision Science, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia
  • Eric Papas
    Brien Holden Vision Institute, Sydney, Australia
    School of Optometry & Vision Science, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia
  • Nerida Cole
    Brien Holden Vision Institute, Sydney, Australia
    School of Optometry & Vision Science, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia
  • Brien A. Holden
    Brien Holden Vision Institute, Sydney, Australia
    School of Optometry & Vision Science, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  Maria Markoulli, None; Eric Papas, None; Nerida Cole, None; Brien A. Holden, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  Brien Holden Vision Institute; Australian Federal Government through the Australian Postgraduate Award; William C. Ezell Fellowship; Cornea and Contact Lens Society of Australia; OVRF-Maki Shiobara
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science April 2011, Vol.52, 6525. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      Maria Markoulli, Eric Papas, Nerida Cole, Brien A. Holden; The Adaptation of the Tear Proteome to Extended Wear Contact Lenses. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2011;52(14):6525.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose: : To establish the impact of contact lenses when worn in the extended wear schedule on the diurnal variation of the tear proteome.

Methods: : Flush tears were collected from 9 healthy non-CL wearers at baseline, during the first day of CL wear and after one month of wear. Participants wore O2Optix® on an extended (EW) schedule. Each time, tears were collected at midday and upon waking and analyzed for concentrations of total protein using the BCA method. Differential two-dimensional gel electrophoresis was then performed to detect biomarkers likely to be affected by CL wear. Samples were labeled with mass and charge matched fluorescent dyes and then separated so that there were two samples per gel. The presence of an internal standard in each gel allowed for the quantification between samples from different gels and hence the identification of biomarkers likely to be affected by CL wear. These spots were then cut and identified with mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS).

Results: : Thirteen protein spots were identified to differ across the visits (p < 0.05). Six of these proteins were unchanged from baseline after one night but increased after one month of wear. One increased after the first night of CL wear and remained elevated even after one month.

Conclusions: : Initial CL wear in the extended wear schedule causes an upregulation in some proteins and a down regulation of others, this profile continuing to change even after one month of wear.

Keywords: contact lens • proteomics • cornea: tears/tear film/dry eye 
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