April 2011
Volume 52, Issue 14
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   April 2011
Ophthalmic Photoacoustic Imaging for Blood Distribution Evaluation
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Yannis M. Paulus
    Eye Institute at Stanford,
    Stanford University, Palo Alto, California
  • Adam de la Zerda
    Department of Electrical Engineering,
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Radiology,
    Stanford University, Palo Alto, California
  • Robert Teed
    Department of Electrical Engineering,
    Stanford University, Palo Alto, California
  • Sunil Bodapati
    Department of Electrical Engineering,
    Stanford University, Palo Alto, California
  • Yosh Dollberg
    Active Ventures Group, Raanana, Israel
  • Butrus T. Khuri-Yakub
    Department of Electrical Engineering,
    Stanford University, Palo Alto, California
  • Mark S. Blumenkranz
    Eye Institute at Stanford,
    Stanford University, Palo Alto, California
  • Darius M. Moshfeghi
    Eye Institute at Stanford,
    Stanford University, Palo Alto, California
  • Sanjiv S. Gambhir
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Radiology,
    Departments of Bioengineering & Material Science and Engineering,
    Stanford University, Palo Alto, California
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science April 2011, Vol.52, 6573. doi:
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Yannis M. Paulus, Adam de la Zerda, Robert Teed, Sunil Bodapati, Yosh Dollberg, Butrus T. Khuri-Yakub, Mark S. Blumenkranz, Darius M. Moshfeghi, Sanjiv S. Gambhir; Ophthalmic Photoacoustic Imaging for Blood Distribution Evaluation. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2011;52(14):6573.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract
 
Purpose:
 

Currently available retinal imaging devices (e.g., OCT) are optically-based and primarily visualize anatomy. Photoacoustic imaging provides physiologic information of optically deep tissue with a high spatial resolution. We demonstrate photoacoustic imaging in pig eyes ex vivo and in living rabbit eyes.

 
Methods:
 

A photoacoustic system is constructed using a tunable, pulsed Nd:YAG laser with a repetition rate of 10 Hz and pulse width of 5 ns. Illumination is provided through a fiber optic ring (mean laser pulse energy density 0.5 mJ/cm^2). Ultrasound transducers with 15 and 25 MHz frequencies acquired both pulse-echo and photoacoustic images, leading to axial resolutions of 83 and 50 µm and lateral resolutions of 200 and 240 µm, respectively. This instrument is used to scan 2 enucleated pig eyes and 5 New Zealand rabbits. A second generation photoacoustic system is developed with improved 35 µm resolution.

 
Results:
 

We demonstrate co-registered photoacoustic and ultrasound images and visualize the orbit with a high depth of penetration while showing blood distribution. Figure 1 shows external photographic (A), coronal (B) and parasagittal (D) photoacoustic, ultrasonographic (C), and 3D photoacoustic (E) images. The pig eye image was acquired using 8 averages of 63 A-scan lines 250 µm apart. In rabbits, the acquisition consists of 32 averages of a scanned area 12 mm by 8 mm in 250 µm steps. Improved 35 µm resolution is demonstrated with a phantom of two crossing hairs (F).

 
Conclusions:
 

We developed a novel photoacoustic imaging device to noninvasively image the retina, choroid, and optic nerve. Using safe laser intensity, this system visualizes blood distribution in pig and rabbit eyes. Simultaneously acquired ultrasound images visualize ocular anatomy. Photoacoustic imaging may be used for early detection and improved management of neovascular ocular diseases, including AMD and PDR.  

 
Keywords: imaging methods (CT, FA, ICG, MRI, OCT, RTA, SLO, ultrasound) • imaging/image analysis: non-clinical • oxygen 
×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×