March 2012
Volume 53, Issue 14
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   March 2012
24-hour Iop Monitoring With The Sensimed Triggerfish® Contact Lens: Effect Of Body Posture During Sleep
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Laura Beltran-Agullo
    Department of Ophthalmology and Vision Sciences,
    Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • Yvonne M. Buys
    Department of Ophthalmology and Vision Sciences,
    Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • Farzana Jahan
    Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • Sonja Simon-Zoula
    Sensimed AG, Lausanne, Switzerland
  • Colin Shapiro
    Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • John G. Flanagan
    Department of Ophthalmology and Vision Sciences,
    Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • Graham E. Trope
    Department of Ophthalmology and Vision Sciences,
    Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  Laura Beltran-Agullo, None; Yvonne M. Buys, None; Farzana Jahan, Sensimed AG, Lausanne, Switzerland (F); Sonja Simon-Zoula, Sensimed AG, Lausanne, Switzerland (E); Colin Shapiro, None; John G. Flanagan, None; Graham E. Trope, Sensimed AG, Lausanne, Switzerland (F)
  • Footnotes
    Support  None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science March 2012, Vol.53, 5117. doi:
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      Laura Beltran-Agullo, Yvonne M. Buys, Farzana Jahan, Sonja Simon-Zoula, Colin Shapiro, John G. Flanagan, Graham E. Trope; 24-hour Iop Monitoring With The Sensimed Triggerfish® Contact Lens: Effect Of Body Posture During Sleep. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2012;53(14):5117.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract
 
Purpose:
 

To determine the difference in relative IOP measured by the SENSIMED Triggerfish® (TF) in flat compared to 30° head-up sleeping positions in patients with glaucoma. A previous study showed a 20% lower IOP with 30° head-up position in 1/3 of the patients with glaucoma.

 
Methods:
 

Patients with progressive POAG or NTG (defined as a new or recurrent optic disc haemorrhage) despite well-controlled IOP were evaluated in this prospective, randomized, cross-over comparative study. IOP was monitored non-invasively for 24hr using the TF contact lenses in 2 separate sessions. Patients were randomly assigned to sleep flat one night and 30° head-up the other. TF IOP-monitoring curves in arbitrary units were obtained. Sleep and wake periods were defined as 22:00-6:00 and 8:00-22:00 respectively. Mean TF values at sleep and wake periods and wake-sleep and sleep-wake slopes were calculated for each session. Comparisons were made between flat and 30° head-up positions. The slopes were calculated from linear regression of TF measurements on time. The significance of each slope (significance difference from 0) was calculated using a Z-test (comparison between the mean of a set of measurements and a given constant, here 0). Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to compare mean TF values between positions.

 
Results:
 

To date 6 subjects have completed the study. One subject withdrew consent after the first session and another had an incomplete TF curve which was excluded. 4 of 6 subjects (7 curves) had significant positive wake-sleep slope which were steeper in 22:00-2:00 interval (Flat, 0.05-1.67; 30° , 0.08-0.85). One patient had negative slopes (Flat, -0.05; 30° , -0.06) and one had a non significant positive slope. The slopes were steeper for flat position compared to 30° head-up although no overall significant mean difference was found. Mean hourly TF values during sleep from 22:00-6:00 were significantly higher in 3 of 4 subjects in the flat position (p<0.05 for each of the 3 subjects). Fig.1 shows the overall mean hourly TF values with higher values in the flat position.

 
Conclusions:
 

In this pilot study, the IOP increased while sleeping in patients with progressive glaucoma, being higher in the flat position compared to 30° head-up in some patients.  

 
Keywords: intraocular pressure • contact lens • circadian rhythms 
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