March 2012
Volume 53, Issue 14
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   March 2012
Validity of a Miniaturised Open-field Aberrometer with Surgical Application
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • James S. Wolffsohn
    School of Life and Health Sciences, Aston University, Birmingham, United Kingdom
  • Uday K. Bhatt
    School of Life and Health Sciences, Aston University, Birmingham, United Kingdom
  • Amy L. Sheppard
    School of Life and Health Sciences, Aston University, Birmingham, United Kingdom
  • Sunil Shah
    Midland Eye Institute, Birmingham, United Kingdom
  • Harmindar Dua
    Ophthalmology, Nottingham University, Nottingham, United Kingdom
  • Toshifuma Mihashi
    Topcon, Tokyo, Japan
  • Tatsuo Yamaguchi
    Topcon, Tokyo, Japan
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  James S. Wolffsohn, Wavefront aberration measuring device, operating microscope and slit lamp Japanese Application 2010-220857 (P); Uday K. Bhatt, None; Amy L. Sheppard, None; Sunil Shah, None; Harmindar Dua, None; Toshifuma Mihashi, Topcon (E), Wavefront aberration measuring device, operating microscope and slit lamp Japanese Application 2010-220857. (P); Tatsuo Yamaguchi, Topcon (E), Wavefront aberration measuring device, operating microscope and slit lamp Japanese Application 2010-220857. (P)
  • Footnotes
    Support  None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science March 2012, Vol.53, 6725. doi:https://doi.org/
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      James S. Wolffsohn, Uday K. Bhatt, Amy L. Sheppard, Sunil Shah, Harmindar Dua, Toshifuma Mihashi, Tatsuo Yamaguchi; Validity of a Miniaturised Open-field Aberrometer with Surgical Application. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2012;53(14):6725. doi: https://doi.org/.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose: : To assess the validity of a new miniaturised, open-field wavefront device which has been designed to attach to a surgical microscope (the Aston Aberrometer).

Methods: : The dynamic range of the Aston Aberrometer was assessed using a calibrated model eye. The validity of the Aston Aberrometer was compared to a conventional desk mounted Hartmann-Shack aberrometer (KR1W, Topcon) by measuring the refractive error and higher order aberrations of 156 dilated eyes of 78 patients with both instruments in random order. The Aston Aberrometer measurements were repeated 5 times to assess intra-session repeatability. Data was converted to vector form for analysis.

Results: : The Aston Aberrometer had a wide dynamic range of at least +21.0 D to -25.0 D. The measurements from the Aston Aberrometer were similar to a conventional aberrometer for mean spherical equivalent (mean difference ± 95% confidence interval: 0.00 ± 0.51D; correlation: r=0.995, p<0.001), astigmatic components (J0: 0.01 ± 0.16D; r=0.97, p<0.001; J45: 0.04 ± 0.29; r=0.664, p<0.001) and higher order aberrations RMS (-0.02 ± 0.18D; r=0.736, p<0.001). Intraclass correlation coefficient assessments of intra-sessional repeatability for the Aston Aberrometer were excellent (spherical equivalent =1.000, p<0.001; astigmatic components J0 =0.998, p<0.001, J45=0.980, p<0.01; higher order aberrations RMS =0.961, p<0.001).

Conclusions: : The Aston Aberrometer gives valid and repeatable measures of refractive error and higher order aberrations over a wide range. As it is able to measure continuously, it can provide direct feedback to surgeons as to the optical status of the visual system during intraocular lens implantations and corneal surgery.

Keywords: cataract • intraocular lens • cornea: clinical science 
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