April 2011
Volume 52, Issue 14
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   April 2011
Predictors of Compliance with Vision Correction Following Vision Screening Failure - Two Models of Care
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Ruth E. Manny
    College of Optometry, University of Houston, Houston, Texas
  • Lisa A. Jones-Jordan
    College of Optometry, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio
  • Loraine Sinnott
    College of Optometry, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio
  • Dawn H. Messer
    Ophthalmology, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona
  • Dan Twelker
    Ophthalmology, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona
  • Susan A. Cotter
    Pediatric Optometry, Southern Calif Coll of Optometry, Fullerton, California
  • Robert N. Kleinstein
    Optometry, Univ of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama
  • Mabel Crescioni
    Ophthalmology, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona
  • CLEERE Study Group
    College of Optometry, University of Houston, Houston, Texas
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  Ruth E. Manny, None; Lisa A. Jones-Jordan, None; Loraine Sinnott, None; Dawn H. Messer, None; Dan Twelker, None; Susan A. Cotter, None; Robert N. Kleinstein, None; Mabel Crescioni, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  National Eye Institute and the Office of Minority Research/National Institutes of Health, grants U10-EY08893 and R24-EY014792. Ohio Lions Eye Research Foundation and the E.F. Wildermuth Foundation.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science April 2011, Vol.52, 2504. doi:https://doi.org/
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      Ruth E. Manny, Lisa A. Jones-Jordan, Loraine Sinnott, Dawn H. Messer, Dan Twelker, Susan A. Cotter, Robert N. Kleinstein, Mabel Crescioni, CLEERE Study Group; Predictors of Compliance with Vision Correction Following Vision Screening Failure - Two Models of Care. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2011;52(14):2504. doi: https://doi.org/.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose: : To determine if compliance with vision correction one year after vision screening failure in two models of care was associated with the care model, demographics, or other factors.

Methods: : The sample included 445 children participating in the multi-center Collaborative Longitudinal Evaluation of Ethnicity and Refractive Error (CLEERE) who had habitual visual acuity (VA) of 20/40 or worse due to uncorrected refractive error at a CLEERE study visit (vision screening failure) and returned the following year. Two models of care were used depending on the study site. The parents of the 295 children with VA of 20/40 or worse in Texas and California were sent letters indicating vision screening failure and the need for a complete eye examination, while the 150 children seen primarily in Arizona and Alabama were provided free eyeglasses following a free complete eye examination at the time of the CLEERE visit or following an appointment scheduled separately. Compliance was defined as wearing a correction providing habitual VA of better than 20/40 the next year. Logistic regression models for compliance were fit to assess the importance of care model, ethnicity, gender, age, refractive error, parental income, parental education (average of the 2 parents) and parental myopia as predictors.

Results: : Overall compliance was poor with only 24% presenting at follow-up with an optical correction providing VA of 20/40 or better. Care model, parental income, ethnicity, gender and age were not associated with compliance at follow-up. The final model indicated that children with higher levels of myopia (odds ratio 0.82, p = 0.005) and those whose average parental education was at least high school (odds ratio 2.27, p = 0.003) were more likely to have adequate correction at follow-up.

Conclusions: : Adequate vision correction one year after a vision screening failure was poor but similar to previous reports. In this sample, compliance was not improved by providing free eye examinations and free eyeglasses. Improved compliance was associated with factors that could not be altered and suggests the need to explore additional mechanisms to encourage vision correction wear.

Keywords: clinical (human) or epidemiologic studies: health care delivery/economics/manpower • clinical (human) or epidemiologic studies: treatment/prevention assessment/controlled clinical trials 
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