April 2011
Volume 52, Issue 14
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   April 2011
Incidence and Severity of Retinopathy of Prematurity in Premature Infants with Birth Weight > 1250 grams and/or Gestational Age > 28 weeks
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Mehul H. Nagarsheth
    Ophthalmology, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland Heights, Ohio
  • Alison S. Smith
    Ophthalmology, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland Heights, Ohio
  • Faruk H. Orge
    Ophthalmology, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland Heights, Ohio
  • Jeffrey N. Bloom
    Ophthalmology, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland Heights, Ohio
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  Mehul H. Nagarsheth, None; Alison S. Smith, None; Faruk H. Orge, None; Jeffrey N. Bloom, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science April 2011, Vol.52, 3134. doi:
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      Mehul H. Nagarsheth, Alison S. Smith, Faruk H. Orge, Jeffrey N. Bloom; Incidence and Severity of Retinopathy of Prematurity in Premature Infants with Birth Weight > 1250 grams and/or Gestational Age > 28 weeks. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2011;52(14):3134.

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Abstract

Purpose: : Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) is a vision-threatening disorder of preterm infants. Current guidelines recommend that selected infants with birth weight between 1500 and 2000 g or gestational age more than 32 weeks with an unstable clinical course, including those requiring cardiorespiratory support and who are believed to be high risk by their pediatrician or neonatologist, should have retinal screening examinations performed to detect ROP. In our study, we reviewed ROP examinations in our Level III NICU to determine the upper limits of birth weight and gestational age for which screening is indicated.

Methods: : A retrospective chart review was performed for all premature infants admitted from January 1, 1997- September 30, 2008 at our children’s hospital. 950 charts from this time period were collected and reviewed. Infants with birth weights greater than 1250 grams and/or gestational age greater than 28 weeks were noted and followed for progression, regression, and/or treatment of ROP. Particular attention was paid to a subset of infants with birth weight greater than 1500 grams and/or gestational age greater than 30 weeks.

Results: : In our chart review, we identified 71 subjects with birth weights greater than or equal to 1250 grams, 33 subjects with birth weights equal to or greater than 1500 grams, and 152 subjects born at or greater than 28 weeks gestational age. None of the 33 subjects with birth weights greater than or equal to 1500 grams required laser ROP treatment. Two subjects born with gestational age greater than 30 weeks (3.23%) underwent a course of ROP indicated laser treatment during their follow-up. Both of these subjects had birth weights less than 1500 grams.

Conclusions: : Our data suggest that, unlike the current guidelines above, a birth weight upper limit < 1500 grams is unlikely to miss cases of ROP which would require laser therapy. With a screening birth weight upper limit of 1500 grams, ophthalmologists would be performing less ROP screening examinations. In turn this would be effective at both reducing health-care cost and physical stress to premature infants.

Keywords: retinopathy of prematurity • clinical (human) or epidemiologic studies: prevalence/incidence • clinical (human) or epidemiologic studies: health care delivery/economics/manpower 
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