April 2011
Volume 52, Issue 14
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   April 2011
Assessment of ROP Outpatient Follow Up Compliance Across Three Hospitals
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jules P. Antigua
    Ophthalmology, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
  • Karen Karp
    Ophthalmology, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
  • Anne K. Jensen
    Ophthalmology, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
  • Lisa Erbring
    Ophthalmology, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
  • Gil Binenbaum
    Ophthalmology, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  Jules P. Antigua, None; Karen Karp, None; Anne K. Jensen, None; Lisa Erbring, None; Gil Binenbaum, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  NIH K12 EY-015398 (GB)
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science April 2011, Vol.52, 3149. doi:
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Jules P. Antigua, Karen Karp, Anne K. Jensen, Lisa Erbring, Gil Binenbaum; Assessment of ROP Outpatient Follow Up Compliance Across Three Hospitals. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2011;52(14):3149.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Purpose: : Timely outpatient retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) follow up is critical for prevention of blindness in at-risk infants. We sought to assess outpatient ROP compliance across 3 Philadelphia hospitals, identify factors that influence show rates, and determine continued risk among infants lost to follow up.

Methods: : Retrospective study of all infants requiring ROP exams and discharged home prior to retinal vascular maturity in 2007-09. Data collected included appointments scheduled, visit compliance, birth weight (BW), gestational age (GA), diagnosis and postmenstrual age (PMA) at last ROP exam, median family income (US Census) based on home zip code, and parent education and visit scheduling method at each hospital, designated A, B, and C.

Results: : 566 infants met criteria at the 3 hospitals. All infants had outpatient ROP appointments scheduled for within 1-3 weeks of last exam, 539 (95%) with us, 27 (5%) elsewhere. Overall, 498 (92%) of 539 infants scheduled with us showed for outpatient follow-up. In multivariate regression, overall compliance was related to younger PMA (p=0.03), but not hospital, BW, GA, ROP diagnosis, weeks to appointment, or income. All hospitals required parents to sign a statement prior to discharge acknowledging ROP risk and importance of follow-up. A and B always made the appointment; C did so selectively, requiring many parents to call our office, but a ROP coordinator called those who did not. Only C consistently provided written ROP education. First-appointment show rates were 75% A, 82% B, 89% C (p=0.003). Coordinator calls, certified letters, and social work help for transportation or child services involvement increased the show rates to 88% A, 93% B, 94% (p=0.19). Considering PMA, BW, GA, ROP stage, zone, and disease course, only 9 of the 41 "no-show" infants were thought to be still at risk (8 with immature zone 2, PMA<38 wks; and 1 with St 2 Zn 2, PMA 37 wks).

Conclusions: : Using standardized procedures, a dedicated ROP coordinator, and aggressive "no-show" follow up, it is possible to attain scheduling and show rates that are significantly higher than previous reports, with very few infants left at significant risk. Written ROP education increases compliance with the first scheduled appointment.

Keywords: retinopathy of prematurity • clinical (human) or epidemiologic studies: systems/equipment/techniques 
×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×