April 2011
Volume 52, Issue 14
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   April 2011
Correlation between Macular Pigment Optical Density and Macular Volume in Normal Subjects and Subjects with Cystic Fibrosis
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Anna J. Shi
    Ophthalmology,
    University of California, Davis, Sacramento, California
  • Suman Pilli
    Ophthalmology,
    University of California, Davis, Sacramento, California
  • Brian M. Morrissey
    Pulmonary and Critical Care,
    University of California, Davis, Sacramento, California
  • Carroll E. Cross
    Pulmonary and Critical Care,
    University of California, Davis, Sacramento, California
  • Susanna S. Park
    Ophthalmology,
    University of California, Davis, Sacramento, California
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  Anna J. Shi, None; Suman Pilli, None; Brian M. Morrissey, None; Carroll E. Cross, None; Susanna S. Park, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science April 2011, Vol.52, 3626. doi:
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Anna J. Shi, Suman Pilli, Brian M. Morrissey, Carroll E. Cross, Susanna S. Park; Correlation between Macular Pigment Optical Density and Macular Volume in Normal Subjects and Subjects with Cystic Fibrosis. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2011;52(14):3626.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Purpose: : Macular pigment (MP) is largely derived from two carotenoids, lutein and zeaxanthin, implicated to play a protective role in eyes from age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Previous studies have shown that cystic fibrosis (CF) patients have significantly lower MP than normal subjects, likely due to decreased carotenoid absorption from pancreatic insufficiency. It has been shown that macular pigment optical density (MPOD) correlates with foveal thickness in normal subjects. The purpose of this study is to determine whether MPOD correlates with macular volume (MV) and whether decrease in MPOD in CF subjects is associated with decrease in MV.

Methods: : Six CF subjects with normal best-corrected visual acuity and fundoscopy and 14 age-matched normal subjects were enrolled. MPOD was measured by heterochromatic flicker photometry. Laboratory prototype high resolution Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography 3-dimensional imaging of the macula was obtained for MV measurement.

Results: : Mean age of CF and normal subjects was 34.5 yrs and 35.5 yrs, respectively (range 20 to 50 yrs). MPOD was significantly reduced (P<0.05) at all four retinal eccentricities (0.25°, 0.50°, 1°, 1.75°) in CF subjects compared with normal subjects. Macular volume at 0.50° and 1° was also significantly reduced (P<0.05) in CF subjects when compared to normal subjects but no difference in MV was noted at 0.25° and 1.75°. MPOD also correlated significantly (r>0.5, p<0.05) with MV in CF subjects at 0.25° but not significantly at 0.50°, 1°, and 1.75°. In normal subjects, MPOD did not correlate significantly at all four eccentricities measured.

Conclusions: : CF patients have significantly lower MPOD than age-matched normal subjects. CF patients also have significantly reduced macular volumes at two out of the four eccentricities measured. MPOD and MV do not seem to correlate in both CF and normal subjects. The clinical implications of both decreased MPOD and macular volume in CF patients have yet to be determined since these young subjects appear to have normal macular function. Whether decreased MPOD and MV puts CF patients at increased risk for AMD as these patients live to older age has yet to be determined.

Keywords: macula/fovea • macular pigment • carotenoids/carotenoid binding proteins 
×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×