April 2011
Volume 52, Issue 14
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   April 2011
Risk Factors Associated with Glare and Halo after ICL Implantation
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • In Jeong Lyu
    Ophthalmology, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul, Republic of Korea
  • Chihoon Kim
    Ophthalmology, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul, Republic of Korea
  • Eui-Sang Chung
    Ophthalmology, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul, Republic of Korea
  • Tae-Young Chung
    Ophthalmology, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul, Republic of Korea
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  In Jeong Lyu, None; Chihoon Kim, None; Eui-Sang Chung, None; Tae-Young Chung, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science April 2011, Vol.52, 6204. doi:
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      In Jeong Lyu, Chihoon Kim, Eui-Sang Chung, Tae-Young Chung; Risk Factors Associated with Glare and Halo after ICL Implantation. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2011;52(14):6204.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose: : To investigate the incidence and severity of glare and halo after ICL (Implantable contact lens) implantation and analyze the risk factors.

Methods: : Medical charts of 55 eyes of 30 individuals who had undergone ICL implantation were retrospectively reviewed. The incidence and severity of glare and halo were evaluated using the questionnaires at postop 12 months. Pearson partial correlation and multivariate analysis were used to analyze risk factors associated with postop glare and halo. Potential risk factors included in the analysis are as follows; pre and postop pupil size (scotopic and mesopic), pre and postop pupil size difference (scotopic and mesopic), ICL size, ICL power, ICL vaults, toric ICL, white to white diameters (WTW), sulcus to sulcus diameters (STS), residual refractive errors, and higher-order aberrations (total RMS, coma, trefoil, and spherical aberration).

Results: : Mean age of 30 cases (10 men, 20 women) was 30.8±8.3 years (range 18 to 49years) in this study. The incidence of glare and halo was 43.5% and 40.6%, respectively. Patients with severe symptoms were 16.7% and 17.9%, respectively. The existence of halo was significantly related to postoperative pupil size (mesopic, p=0.03, r=0.25), pre and postop pupil size difference (mesopic, p=0.00, r=0.40), and ICL size (p=0.03, r =0.19) and the severity of halo was significantly related to only ICL power (p=0.01, r=0.35) by Pearson partial correlation analysis in control of postoperative residual refractive errors. By multivariate analysis, ICL size turned out to be the single factor associated with postop halo after ICL implantation with the cut-off value of 12.0 mm (P=0.04, Fischer’s exact test). However, there were no statistically significant factors associated with postop glare after ICL implantation.

Conclusions: : Although not severe, the incidence of postop glare and halo after ICL implantation is relatively common. Possible risk factors for postop halo are postop pupil size, pre and postop pupil size difference, and ICL size, with the ICL size being the single most valuable factor.

Keywords: refractive surgery: phakic IOL • quality of life 
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