April 2011
Volume 52, Issue 14
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   April 2011
Treatment Of Symptomatic Convergence Insufficiency Improves Attention In School-aged Children
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Eric Borsting
    Clinical Science,
    Southern California Coll of Optometry, Fullerton, California
  • G. Lynn Mitchell
    College of Optometry, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio
  • Mitchell Scheiman
    Eye Institute-Coll of Optometry, Pennsylvania College of Optometry, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
  • Marjean T. Kulp
    College of Optometry, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio
  • Christopher Chase
    Optometry, Western University of Health Sciences, Pomona, California
  • Susan Cotter
    Pediatric Optometry,
    Southern California Coll of Optometry, Fullerton, California
  • CITT-RS Study Group
    Southern California Coll of Optometry, Fullerton, California
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  Eric Borsting, None; G. Lynn Mitchell, None; Mitchell Scheiman, None; Marjean T. Kulp, None; Christopher Chase, None; Susan Cotter, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  Grant from COVD
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science April 2011, Vol.52, 6375. doi:https://doi.org/
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      Eric Borsting, G. Lynn Mitchell, Mitchell Scheiman, Marjean T. Kulp, Christopher Chase, Susan Cotter, CITT-RS Study Group; Treatment Of Symptomatic Convergence Insufficiency Improves Attention In School-aged Children. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2011;52(14):6375. doi: https://doi.org/.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose: : The purpose of this study was to compare parent ratings of attention for children with symptomatic convergence insufficiency (CI) to normative values and to evaluate the impact of office-based treatment for symptomatic CI on attention as measured by parental report.

Methods: : Forty four children ages 9 to 17 years with symptomatic CI completed 16 weeks of office-based vergence/accommodative therapy with home reinforcement. Prior to treatment and 8 weeks post-treatment one parent of each child completed the Conners 3 ADHD Index (AI) for parents, a screening index for attention. Responses on the survey were converted into a T-score with mean of 50 and standard deviation of 10 with higher scores indicating a greater frequency of problem behaviors. T-tests were used to compare the baseline score to published normative values and the improvements in score to zero.

Results: : The Conners 3 AI T-score at baseline was significantly higher than normative values with a mean of 63 and a 95% confidence interval of 57 to 68. The mean score was significantly improved (lower) (p<0.0001) at the post-treatment visit with a mean of 53 and a confidence interval of 49 to 57. In fact, the 10 point reduction in a T-score was greater than what would be expected based on the repeatability of the Connors 3 AI (6 points). Greater changes in T-scores were observed in children with higher T-scores at baseline.

Conclusions: : Children with symptomatic CI showed reduced attention prior to treatment and improvements in attention as measured by the Connors 3 AI following 16 weeks of office based vergence/accommodative therapy. Future studies should include a control group to further evaluate the potential impact of CI treatment on measures of attention.

Keywords: strabismus: treatment • esotropia and exotropia • vergence 
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