April 2010
Volume 51, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   April 2010
Optical Coherence Angiography for Polypoidal Choroidal Vasculopathy
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • M. Miura
    Dept of Ophthalmology, Tokyo Med Univ, Ibaraki Medical Center, Inashiki, Japan
    Computational Optics and Ophthalmology Group, Tsukuba, Japan
  • S. Makita
    Computational Optics and Ophthalmology Group, Tsukuba, Japan
    Computational Optics Group, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Japan
  • T. Iwasaki
    Dept of Ophthalmology, Tokyo Med Univ, Ibaraki Medical Center, Inashiki, Japan
    Computational Optics and Ophthalmology Group, Tsukuba, Japan
  • Y. Yasuno
    Computational Optics and Ophthalmology Group, Tsukuba, Japan
    Computational Optics Group, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Japan
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  M. Miura, None; S. Makita, None; T. Iwasaki, None; Y. Yasuno, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  None.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science April 2010, Vol.51, 281. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      M. Miura, S. Makita, T. Iwasaki, Y. Yasuno; Optical Coherence Angiography for Polypoidal Choroidal Vasculopathy. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2010;51(13):281.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose: : To evaluate the vascular architecture of polypoidal choroidai vasculopathy (PCV) using optical coherence angiography (OCA). To demonstrate the clinical application of Doppler optical coherence tomography (OCT) and OCA for macular disease.

Methods: : We prospectively examined 16 eyes of 16 patients with PCV using 1020 nm high-speed high-resolution spectral-domain Doppler OCT (47000 A-scan/s, axial resolution 4.3 um). The scanning range was 6.0 x 6.0 mm on the retina with 1500 A-scans × 128 B-scans. Three dimensional vasculature images of the choroidal vessels were constructed from the phase sensitive Doppler analysis (Doppler OCA) and the intensity threshold based segmentation (scattering OCA). Each OCA image was compared with the indocyanine angiography image.

Results: : Findings in the Doppler OCA images represent the arterial phase of indocyanine angiography images. In the Doppler OCA images, penetration of the Bruch’s membrane by the feeder vessels and the distribution of abnormal vascular network could be clearly observed. The Doppler signals from the abnormal vascular networks were located in the fluid space between the Bruch’s membrane and retinal pigment epithelium.Findings in the scattering OCA images represent the venous phase of indocyanine angiography images. In the scattering OCA images, the polypoidal lesions were clearly observed in all eyes. After intravitreal ranibizumab injection with photodynamic therapy, these polypoidal lesions disappeared in both scattering OCA images and the indocyanine angiography images.

Conclusions: : There are controversies over the origin of abnormal vascular network in PCV. In the Doppler OCA images, abnormal vascular network of PCV was detected in the fluid space between the Bruch’s membrane and retinal pigment epithelium. This finding suggests that the vascular network in PCV is a variation of choroidal neovascular membrane. Scattering OCA is useful to evaluate the polypoidal lesions in PCV. OCA and Doppler OCT assist the rapid non-invasive assessments of macular disease.

Keywords: imaging methods (CT, FA, ICG, MRI, OCT, RTA, SLO, ultrasound) • age-related macular degeneration • choroid: neovascularization 
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