April 2010
Volume 51, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   April 2010
Effects of All-Trans Retinoic Acid Nanoparticles (NANOEGG® -atRA) on Corneal Epithelial Wound Healing
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • M. Hattori
    Ophthalmology, Osaka Medical College, Takatsuki, Japan
  • K. Shimizu
    Ophthalmology, Osaka Medical College, Takatsuki, Japan
  • K. Katsumura
    Ophthalmology, Osaka Medical College, Takatsuki, Japan
  • T. Ikeda
    Ophthalmology, Osaka Medical College, Takatsuki, Japan
  • Y. Sano
    Ophthalmology, Sano Eye Clinic, Ayabe, Japan
  • K. Matsumoto
    Institute of Medical Science, St Marianna University School of Medicine, Kawasaki, Japan
  • Y. Yamaguchi
    Institute of Medical Science, St Marianna University School of Medicine, Kawasaki, Japan
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  M. Hattori, None; K. Shimizu, None; K. Katsumura, None; T. Ikeda, None; Y. Sano, None; K. Matsumoto, None; Y. Yamaguchi, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  None.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science April 2010, Vol.51, 382. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      M. Hattori, K. Shimizu, K. Katsumura, T. Ikeda, Y. Sano, K. Matsumoto, Y. Yamaguchi; Effects of All-Trans Retinoic Acid Nanoparticles (NANOEGG® -atRA) on Corneal Epithelial Wound Healing. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2010;51(13):382.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose: : We have prepared inorganic-coated all-trans retinoic acid (atRA) nanoparticles, an egg-like structure in nano-scale (NANOEGG®-atRA), using boundary-organized reaction droplets. The purpose of this present study was to investigate the effects of NANOEGG® -atRA on corneal wound healing, both in vitro and in vivo.

Methods: : SV40-immortalized human corneal epithelial cells (HCE-T) were cultured to subconfluence on 6-well plates and starved for 24 hours. The HCE-T cells were then wounded with a 200 µl pipette tip and cultured in serum-free medium containing either 0-, 10-3-, 10-5-, or 10-7% of NANOEGG® -atRA. The wound width of each well was measured every 6 hours from 0 to 24 hours after wounding. For the in vivo experiments, a 6-mm-diameter circular incision was made on the center of the rabbit corneas, and corneal epithelium was then removed. Rabbits were divided into five treatment groups receiving 50µl of either 0-, 0.05-, 0.5-, 1-, or 5% NANOEGG®-atRA in saline. Treatments were administered topically to the affected eyes three times a day at intervals of 2 hours after corneal abrasion. Wound healing in response to the treatments at 24 hours was expressed as the percentage of fluorescein-stained area compared to that of at 0 hours.

Results: : The ratio of wound widths (24 hr/0 hr after wounding) was 0.69 ± 0.20 (0%), 0.62 ± 0.19 (10-3 %), 0.51 ± 0.20 (10-5 %), and 0.50 ± 0.21 (10-7 %) (p=0.02: Fisher’s PLSD). The percentage of wound area at 24 hours in the 0-, 0.05-, 0.5-, 1-, and 5% NANOEGG®-atRA treatment groups was 37.1 ± 0.07%, 34.2 ± 0.01%, 31.2 ± 0.07%, 25.8 ± 0.13%, and 28.7 ± 0.13%, respectively. The percentage of wound area of the 1% NANOEGG®-atRA treatment group was significantly greater than that of the control (p=0.03: Fisher’s PLSD).

Conclusions: : The results of this study indicate that NANOEGG®-atRA may be useful for the treatment of corneal epithelial wounds.

Keywords: cornea: epithelium • wound healing • drug toxicity/drug effects 
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