April 2010
Volume 51, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   April 2010
Nasal Dominant Distribution of the Blood and Lymphatic Vessels in the Cornea
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • T. Ecoiffier
    Center of Eye Disease and Development, Program in Vision Science, and School of Optometry, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, California
  • D. Yuen
    Center of Eye Disease and Development, Program in Vision Science, and School of Optometry, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, California
  • L. Chen
    Center of Eye Disease and Development, Program in Vision Science, and School of Optometry, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, California
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  T. Ecoiffier, None; D. Yuen, None; L. Chen, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  This work is supported in part by NIH grant, DoD grant, and the Junior Faculty Research Grant from University of California at Berkeley (LC)
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science April 2010, Vol.51, 417. doi:
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      T. Ecoiffier, D. Yuen, L. Chen; Nasal Dominant Distribution of the Blood and Lymphatic Vessels in the Cornea. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2010;51(13):417.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Purpose: : Due to its unique characteristics, the cornea has been widely used for blood and lymphatic vessel research. However, it has never been studied whether limbal or corneal vessels are evenly distributed under normal or inflamed conditions. The purpose of this study was to investigate this question and to examine whether and how the distribution patterns change during corneal inflammatory lymphangiogenesis (LG) and hemangiogenesis (HG).

Methods: : Corneal inflammatory LG and HG was induced in two most commonly used mouse strains, BALB/c and C57BL/6 (6-8 weeks of age), by a standardized two-suture placement model. Oriented flat-mount corneas together with the limbal tissues were used for immunofluorescent microscopic studies. Blood and lymphatic vessels under both normal and inflamed conditions were analyzed and quantified by NIH Image J software to compare their distributions.

Results: : The data demonstrate, for the first time, that both blood and lymphatic vessels were more distributed in the nasal side in normal murine limbal areas. This nasal dominant pattern was maintained during corneal inflammatory LG while it was lost for HG.

Conclusions: : Blood and lymphatic vessels are not evenly distributed in normal limbal areas. Furthermore, corneal LG and HG respond to inflammatory stimulus in different manners. These new findings will shed some light on our understanding of corneal physiology and pathogenesis and the development of experimental models and therapeutic strategies for corneal diseases.

Keywords: cornea: basic science • neovascularization • anatomy 
×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×