April 2010
Volume 51, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   April 2010
The Function of Cellular Retinaldehyde Binding Protein (CRALBP) in the Mouse Retina Visual Cycle
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • J.-S. Wang
    Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences, Washington Univeristy School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri
  • V. J. Kefalov
    Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences, Washington Univeristy School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science April 2010, Vol.51, 1114. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      J.-S. Wang, V. J. Kefalov; The Function of Cellular Retinaldehyde Binding Protein (CRALBP) in the Mouse Retina Visual Cycle. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2010;51(13):1114.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose: : We recently characterized a visual cycle in the retinas of rod-dominant species, including amphibians, rodents, and primates. This pathway is independent of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and instead involves Müller glia, which provide chromophore selectively to cones and not rods. CRALBP is expressed in both RPE and Müller cells and plays an important role in the RPE visual cycle. Here we address the role of CRALBP in the retina visual cycle.

Methods: : We crossed CRALBP-deficient mice (Rlbp-/-) with mice lacking rod transducin (Gnat1-/-) to facilitate cone recordings. We then compared cone function in Rlbp-/-/Gnat1-/- and in control Gnat1-/- mice. Using suction electrode, we recorded membrane currents from single cones. Using trans-retinal electroretinogram (ERG), we recorded cone a-wave responses from isolated retinas with pharmacologically inhibited synaptic transmission.

Results: : Rlbp-/-/Gnat1-/-

Conclusions: : Our results demonstrate that CRALBP is not necessary for the function of the retina visual cycle. However, CRALBP accelerates significantly its action and plays an important role in the timely dark adaptation of cones.

Keywords: electrophysiology: non-clinical • photoreceptors • retinoids/retinoid binding proteins 
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