April 2010
Volume 51, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   April 2010
In vivo Feasibility Study of Polymer Exchange in Phaco-Ersatz Rabbit Eyes
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • E. Lee
    Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida
  • E. Arrieta
    Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida
  • M. C. Aguilar
    Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida
  • E. Hernandez
    Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida
  • F. Ponce
    Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida
  • J.-M. Parel
    Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida
    Vision Cooperative Research Centre, Sydney, Australia
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science April 2010, Vol.51, 809. doi:
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      E. Lee, E. Arrieta, M. C. Aguilar, E. Hernandez, F. Ponce, J.-M. Parel; In vivo Feasibility Study of Polymer Exchange in Phaco-Ersatz Rabbit Eyes. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2010;51(13):809.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose: : To assess the feasibility of polymer exchange in rabbit eyes that underwent a lens capsule refilling procedure.

Methods: : The right eye of 5 animals underwent Phaco-Ersatz surgery wherein the capsular bag was emptied, a mini-capsulorhexis valve (MCV, Fernandez et al, JCRS 2004) positioned and the capsule refilled with a polymer that was cured using light. OS served as controls. POD ranged from 139 to 240. Under anesthesia, corneal incisions of 3.0mm were made at 10 and 2 o’clock and the MCV removed. The polymer was extracted by I/A. The de novo lens matter (regrowth) was removed with a phacoemulsification probe (Sovereign Compact, AMO, Irvine, CA) fitted with 0.7mm titanium tip (MST Inc, Redmond WA). A new MCV was placed and new polymer injected in the empty capsular bag.

Results: : All five cases of polymer exchange were successful. In all but one, the original capsulorhexis size was successfully maintained (dia 0.8 to 3.8mm), allowing the MCV to be replaced with one of the same size while in the other a 3.0mm MCV replaced a 2.5mm MCV. Removal of the original MCV posed slight complications due to MCV’s that were too large in relation to the rhexis size and iris synechiae that developed with the rhexis edge and MCV. Regenerated lens matter removal was more difficult than the polymer extraction. In one animal, capsule fibrosis had occurred creating a long streak across the lens that couldn’t be removed while in the other 4, a clear lens was obtained. Total surgical time ranged from 50 to 65 mins. MCV replacement along with polymer re-injections were successful and no leakage were observed.

Conclusions: : Polymer exchange in Phaco-Ersatz is feasible should there be a need to replace the polymer during follow-up. Long-term studies are needed to test the biocompatibility of such polymer exchange.

Keywords: accommodation • aging • anterior segment 
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