April 2010
Volume 51, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   April 2010
Expression of Specific Ganglion Cell Proteins by Brn3-Positive Retinal Ganglion Cells in Mouse
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • V. Jain
    National Brain Research Centre, Gurgaon, India
  • D. Poria
    Systems Neuroscience,
    National Brain Research Centre, Gurgaon, India
  • O. Saha
    Systems Neuroscience,
    National Brain Research Centre, Gurgaon, India
  • N. K. Dhingra
    Systems Neuroscience,
    National Brain Research Centre, Gurgaon, India
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  V. Jain, None; D. Poria, None; O. Saha, None; N.K. Dhingra, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  None.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science April 2010, Vol.51, 887. doi:
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      V. Jain, D. Poria, O. Saha, N. K. Dhingra; Expression of Specific Ganglion Cell Proteins by Brn3-Positive Retinal Ganglion Cells in Mouse. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2010;51(13):887.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose: : Brn3 family of POU domain transcription factors are required for the development and survival of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). Interestingly, these proteins are expressed by ~70% of RGCs even in adult retina, raising a possibility that these cells have a defined physiological role. To explore this, we studied the expression by Brn3-positive RGCs of specific ganglion cell proteins, including nonphosphorylated neurofilaments, parvalbumin and melanopsin.

Methods: : Retinal wholemounts and radial sections from adult C57BL6 mouse were subjected to fluorescent double immunostaining for Brn3 or Brn3a and SMI-32, parvalbumin or melanopsin. Digital images were taken under epifluorescence microscope using two different emissions, and the data analyzed for co-expression of Brn3/Brn3a with the other proteins.

Results: : A small proportion of Brn3-positive RGCs expressed SMI-32 or parvalbumin. Approximately 3% of Brn3-positive cells were also positive for SMI-32. However, more than 40% of SMI32-positive RGCs expressed Brn3. Similarly, a subset of parvalbumin-positive cells expressed Brn3. With melanopsin C-terminus antibody that labels predominantly M1 type of intrinsically photosensitive RGCs (ipRGCs), we found that none of the Brn3a-positive RGCs, and a 0.2% of Brn3-positive RGCs expressed melanopsin. However, with melanopsin N-terminus antibody that labels both M1 and M2 type of ipRGCs, we found that none of the Brn3a-positive RGCs, but a relatively larger proportion of Brn3-positive cells expressed melanopsin.

Conclusions: : Our study on co-localization of Brn3 and SMI-32 or parvalbumin is consistent with the hypothesis that Brn3-positive RGCs comprise multiple morphological and physiological subtypes, and therfore may not have a single physiological role. The results on coexpression of Brn3/Brn3a and melanopsin suggest that a small subset of Brn3b- and/or Brn3c-, but not Brn3a-positive RGCs coexpress melanopsin, and that the M2, but not the M1 type of ipRGCs preferentially express these Brn3 isoforms.

Keywords: ganglion cells • retina • transcription factors 
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