April 2010
Volume 51, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   April 2010
Macular Pigment is Related to Reduced Glare Disability, Improved Photostress Recovery, and Contrast Enhancement
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • M. J. Dengler
    Vision Sciences Laboratory, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia
  • L. M. Fletcher
    Vision Sciences Laboratory, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia
  • J. M. Stringham
    Northrop-Grumman Corp., Air Force Research Laboratory, Brooks City Base, Texas
  • L. M. Renzi
    Georgia Gwinnett College, Lawrenceville, Georgia
  • W. Schalch
    DSM Nutritional Products Ltd., Basel, Switzerland
  • B. R. Hammond, Jr.
    Vision Sciences Laboratory, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  M.J. Dengler, None; L.M. Fletcher, None; J.M. Stringham, None; L.M. Renzi, None; W. Schalch, DSM Nutritional Products Ltd., E; B.R. Hammond, Jr., None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  DSM Nutritional Products Ltd., Kemin Industries Inc.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science April 2010, Vol.51, 1296. doi:https://doi.org/
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    • Get Citation

      M. J. Dengler, L. M. Fletcher, J. M. Stringham, L. M. Renzi, W. Schalch, B. R. Hammond, Jr.; Macular Pigment is Related to Reduced Glare Disability, Improved Photostress Recovery, and Contrast Enhancement. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2010;51(13):1296. doi: https://doi.org/.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose: : The idea that yellow intra-ocular pigments could improve vision through optical mechanisms has been postulated for over a century. The yellow macular pigments (MP), for instance, could improve vision by absorbing scattered light (e.g., glare) and by increasing contrast across chromatic borders.

Methods: : 111 young (mean age = 22 yrs) healthy subjects were assessed. MP density, glare disability (GD), photostress recovery time (PSR) and contrast enhancement (CE) were all measured psychophysically. GD was measured by varying the energy of a broad-band, 12° annulus in order to veil a 1° central long-wave grating target. PSR was determined by timing visual recovery (reacquiring sight of a shuttered 1° circular grating target) following an intense 3-second broad-band bleach. CE was determined by measuring increment thresholds to a 1° long-wave target presented on a 10°, 460 nm circular background.

Results: : MP density was significantly correlated with GD (p < 0.01), PSR (p < 0.01) and CE (p < 0.0001).

Conclusions: : These cross-sectional data (serum data will also be presented), showing a significant relation between MP and GD, PSR, and CE, are the baseline for a year-long clinical trial, now in progress, testing whether supplementing lutein and zeaxanthin leads to improved visual performance.

Clinical Trial: : www.clinicaltrials.gov NCT00909090

Keywords: macular pigment • carotenoids/carotenoid binding proteins • retina 
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