April 2010
Volume 51, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   April 2010
Secular Changes in Trachoma in a Hyperendemic Community in Tanzania
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • S. K. West
    Ophthalmology, Johns Hopkins Wilmer Eye Inst, Baltimore, Maryland
  • B. E. Munoz
    Ophthalmology, Johns Hopkins Wilmer Eye Inst, Baltimore, Maryland
  • H. Mkocha
    Kongwa Trachoma Project, Kongwa, Tanzania, United Republic of
  • M. Wolle
    Ophthalmology, Johns Hopkins Wilmer Eye Inst, Baltimore, Maryland
  • C. Gaydos
    Ophthalmology, Johns Hopkins Wilmer Eye Inst, Baltimore, Maryland
  • T. Quinn
    Ophthalmology, Johns Hopkins Wilmer Eye Inst, Baltimore, Maryland
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  S.K. West, None; B.E. Munoz, None; H. Mkocha, None; M. Wolle, None; C. Gaydos, None; T. Quinn, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science April 2010, Vol.51, 1315. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      S. K. West, B. E. Munoz, H. Mkocha, M. Wolle, C. Gaydos, T. Quinn; Secular Changes in Trachoma in a Hyperendemic Community in Tanzania. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2010;51(13):1315.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose: : To evaluate changes over time in trachoma by age group in a hyper-endemic village in Kongwa, Tanzania.

Methods: : Cross sectional studies for trachoma and ocular C. trachomatis infection on all children in this village have been carried out at baseline, 2, 6, 12, 18 months, and 60, 72, 78, and 84 months post baseline. Clinical grading of follicular trachoma (TF), inflammatory trachoma (TI), and scarring trachoma (TS) were done based on photographs, using the WHO simplified grading scheme. Mass treatement with azithromycin was offered at baseline, 18 months, 60 months, and 72 months post baseline.

Results: : At baseline, trachoma was 60% in children ages 5 and under. After the initial round of mass treatment, trachoma and infection declined, and never again reached pre-treatment levels. After the gap between 18 months and 60 months, re-emergence occurred but not to pre-treatment levels, instead trachoma was consistently around 30%. The increased rate of scarring in 11-15 year olds, predicted to be at 35% from a previous model, does not appear to have occurred by 84 months.

Conclusions: : Trachoma appears to be declining in this formerly hyper-endemic community.

Keywords: trachoma • antibiotics/antifungals/antiparasitics 
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