April 2010
Volume 51, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   April 2010
Visual Electrophysiological and Acuity Assessment in Patients With Infantile Nystagmus Syndrome (INS)
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • V. L. Fu
    Ophthalmology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
    Ophthalmology, Childrens Hospital of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
  • R. W. Hertle
    Ophthalmology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
    Ophthalmology, Childrens Hospital of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  V.L. Fu, None; R.W. Hertle, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  UPMC Ophthalmology Department and Research to Prevent Blindness
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science April 2010, Vol.51, 1465. doi:https://doi.org/
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      V. L. Fu, R. W. Hertle; Visual Electrophysiological and Acuity Assessment in Patients With Infantile Nystagmus Syndrome (INS). Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2010;51(13):1465. doi: https://doi.org/.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Purpose: : INS is associated with decreased high spatial frequency acuity and/or retinal dystrophy. It is due to associated sensory system deficits or genetic origin. This study was to examine visual function in patients with INS.

Methods: : Electorophysiology (Flash Electretinogram (ERG), Sweep and Pattern Visual Evoked Potenital (VEP) and acuity tests (Teller Card Acuity and HOTV) were recorded in 12 children (8.4 months to 16 years old) and 5 adults (32 to 58 years old). The INS was either idiopathic or associated with albinism, retinal dystrophy, high myopia, congenital night blindness or achromatopsia.

Results: : The ERG responses were similar in children and adults. INS patients associated with retinal dystrophy, high myopia, congenital night blindness and achromatopsia displayed abnormal rod and/or cone and moderate acuity deficit (mean±sd=0.61±0.3 LogMAR). INS associated with albinism showed subnormal cone but normal rod ERG and normal parafoveal VEP but mild deficit in visual acuity (mean±sd =0.56±0.03LogMar). Idiopathic INS usually displayed normal ERG, subnormal sweep VEP and mild deficit in visual acuity (mean±sd =0.57±0.04 LogMar).

Conclusions: : INS displayed reduced responses in visual electrophysiology and deficit in visual acuity. Abnormal rate of rod ERG is 33% and cone ERG is 40%. The abnormal rate of VEP is 71%. The rate of deficit in visual tests is 86%. However, the abnormality in visual functions depends on the types of INS. Different intervention plan is necessary for different types of INS.

Keywords: nystagmus • electrophysiology: clinical • visual acuity 
×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×