April 2010
Volume 51, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   April 2010
Rates of Myopia Progression in Children
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • L. A. Donovan
    Institute for Eye Research, Sydney, Australia
    Vision Cooperative Research Ctr, Sydney, Australia
  • P. Sankaridurg
    Institute for Eye Research, Sydney, Australia
    Vision Cooperative Research Ctr, Sydney, Australia
  • A. Ho
    Institute for Eye Research, Sydney, Australia
    Vision Cooperative Research Ctr, Sydney, Australia
  • A. Martinez
    Institute for Eye Research, Sydney, Australia
    Vision Cooperative Research Ctr, Sydney, Australia
  • E. Smith
    College of Optometry, University of Houston, Texas
  • B. A. Holden
    Institute for Eye Research, Sydney, Australia
    School of Optometry and Vision Science, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science April 2010, Vol.51, 1694. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      L. A. Donovan, P. Sankaridurg, A. Ho, A. Martinez, E. Smith, B. A. Holden; Rates of Myopia Progression in Children. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2010;51(13):1694.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract
 
Purpose:
 

To conduct a meta-analysis on rates of progression of myopia in children in different ethnic groups and as a function of age.

 
Methods:
 

The National Library of Medicine’s PubMed literature database was searched for articles on myopia progression using the terms ‘myopi*progression’ and MeSH terms ‘myopia’ and ‘disease progression’ and limited to publications from January 1990 and only for humans < 16 y/o. Studies that were non-randomized, did not use cycloplegic autorefraction, had small sample size, dealt with high myopia (>-6.0D) or special subject groups, myopia as part of a syndrome or condition, were retrospective, or used controls wearing other than spectacles, were excluded.

 
Results:
 

175 articles were identified. 25 remained after applying exclusion criteria. The estimated myopic progression after one year of follow-up was -0.53D (95% C.I. -0.32 to -0.74) for Caucasians and -0.87D (95% C.I. -0.73 to -1.01) for Asians. Estimated progression rates were dependent on baseline age with decreasing progression rates as age increased. Graphs below shows annual progression rate vs age. Exponential curves with a constant offset were fitted to Caucasian and Asian eyes. Rates also varied with gender, with progression over 2.4 yr from an average baseline age of 8.9 yr (combined ethnicities), and were 0.66D/yr for females and 0.58D/yr for males.

 
Conclusions:
 

Our analysis shows higher myopia progression rates in urban Asians as compared with urban Caucasians. Younger children demonstrated greater annual rates of progression of myopia.  

 
Keywords: myopia 
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