April 2010
Volume 51, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   April 2010
The Impact of Severity of Parental Myopia on Myopia in Chinese Children from Guangzhou
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • I. G. Morgan
    ARC COE in Vision Science, Australian National University, Canberra, Australia
  • F. Xiang
    ARC COE in Vision Science, Australian National University, Canberra, Australia
  • M. He
    Preventive Ophthalmology, Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center, Guangzhou, China
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  I.G. Morgan, None; F. Xiang, None; M. He, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  World Health Organization/NIH (NOI-EY-2103) and the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence in Vision Science
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science April 2010, Vol.51, 1699. doi:
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      I. G. Morgan, F. Xiang, M. He; The Impact of Severity of Parental Myopia on Myopia in Chinese Children from Guangzhou. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2010;51(13):1699.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Purpose: : In Guangzhou, 78.3% of children become myopic by the age of 15, irrespective of parental myopia, although parental myopia increases the relative risk by 10-20%. Here, we report on the impact of severity of parental myopia.

Methods: : Cycloplegic refractions were from a population-based sample of 5-15 year-old children from Guangzhou. Parental myopia was assessed with questions for each parent: "Is the child’s father/mother myopic?"(Yes/No/Not sure) and "What is the degree of myopia (right eye)", and classified as mild (less or equal to -0.5D but greater than -3.0D), moderate (less than or equal to -3.0D but greater than -6.0D, and high (less than or equal to -6.0D).

Results: : Information was available for 1567 children aged 12-15. Combinations of mild, moderate and high myopia in the parents were rare, so analysis was restricted to children with no myopia in one parent, and no, mild, moderate or high myopia in the other. The prevalence of myopia was 53.5%, 65.1%, 76.3% and 80.6% in children when the severity of myopia in the second parent was no, mild, moderate and high, and the proportions of high myopia were 1.4%, 2.9%, 8.5% and 16.1% in the corresponding groups. The prevalence of high myopia in the parents was 1.5%, while in the 15 year-old children, it was 3.9%. Of the children with high myopia, 42.1% had parents with no myopia.

Conclusions: : There was an increased prevalence of myopia with increasing severity of myopia in one parent, and an increased risk of high myopia with one highly myopic parent. However most highly myopic children at the age of 12-15 did not have a highly myopic parent. This suggests that environmental factors contribute to high myopia in Chinese children in Guangzhou, just as they contribute to less severe myopia in children.

Keywords: myopia • refractive error development • clinical (human) or epidemiologic studies: risk factor assessment 
×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×