April 2010
Volume 51, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   April 2010
Acanthamoeba Keratitis and Coinfection
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • P. V. Ferrari, Sr.
    Ophthalmology, Federal University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil
  • M. F. Ribeiro
    Ophthalmology, Federal University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil
  • F. Hirai
    Ophthalmology, Federal University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil
  • M. C. Zorat-Yu
    Ophthalmology, Federal University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil
  • A. L. Hofling-Lima
    Ophthalmology, Federal University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil
  • D. de Freitas
    Ophthalmology, Federal University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  P.V. Ferrari, Sr., None; M.F. Ribeiro, None; F. Hirai, None; M.C. Zorat-Yu, None; A.L. Hofling-Lima, None; D. de Freitas, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  None.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science April 2010, Vol.51, 2425. doi:
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      P. V. Ferrari, Sr., M. F. Ribeiro, F. Hirai, M. C. Zorat-Yu, A. L. Hofling-Lima, D. de Freitas; Acanthamoeba Keratitis and Coinfection. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2010;51(13):2425.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose: : To investigate the occurrence of coinfection among patients with positive culture results for Acanthamoeba keratitis (AK).

Methods: : This was a cross-sectional study of records of patients who had diagnosis of AK confirmed by laboratory examination (culture). Results from corneal scrapings from the Ocular Microbiology Laboratory - UNIFESP/EPM from September 1989 to July 2009 were reviewed to determine concurrent bacterial or fungal growth.

Results: : AK was identified in 266 eyes. Bacteria and fungi were isolated in 92 (34.5 %) and 4 (1.50%) eyes, respectively. Among bacteria, the most common microorganism found was coagulase-negative Staphylococcus (62 eyes), followed by Corynebacterium spp (11 eyes), Streptococcus spp (11 eyes), Staphylococcus aureus (4 eyes), and Pseudomonas spp (2 eyes). The most common type of fungus was Candida ssp (2 eyes).

Conclusions: : Bacteria were responsible for most of coinfection cases in individuals with AK. The presence of microbial coinfection may be risk factor for Acanthamoeba adhere to the cornea and also being a factor of poorer prognosis. In the other hand, long-term use of topical medication in patients with AK may be a risk factor for coinfection.

Keywords: Acanthamoeba • keratitis • cornea: clinical science 
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