April 2010
Volume 51, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   April 2010
Static Ocular Counterroll in Patients With Skew Deviation
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • M. Chandrakumar
    Ophthalmology and Vision Sciences,
    The Hospital for Sick Children and University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • A. Blakeman
    Ophthalmology and Vision Sciences,
    The Hospital for Sick Children and University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • H. Goltz
    Ophthalmology and Vision Sciences,
    The Hospital for Sick Children and University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • A. M. Wong
    Ophthalmology,
    The Hospital for Sick Children and University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  M. Chandrakumar, None; A. Blakeman, None; H. Goltz, None; A.M. Wong, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) Grant MOP 57853
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science April 2010, Vol.51, 2532. doi:
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      M. Chandrakumar, A. Blakeman, H. Goltz, A. M. Wong; Static Ocular Counterroll in Patients With Skew Deviation. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2010;51(13):2532.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Introduction: : Static ocular counterroll (OCR) generates compensatory torsional eye movements during static head tilt and it is mediated by the utricles in the inner ear. Skew deviation is a vertical strabismus thought to be caused by imbalance of the VOR pathway that originates from the utricles and projects to ocular motoneurons (i.e. the utriculo-ocular pathway). We hypothesized that if skew deviation is indeed caused by damage to utricular-ocular pathway, patients with skew deviation would show abnormal static OCR gain.

Methods: : Seven normal subjects and seven patients with skew deviation caused by brainstem or cerebellar lesions were recruited. With one eye occluded, subjects viewed a red laser spot against a grid pattern at 1 m. Ocular responses to static passive head roll-tilts of about 20 deg toward each shoulder was recorded using scleral search coils. Static OCR gain was calculated as the change in torsional eye position divided by change in head position during sustained head tilt.

Results: : In normal subjects, OCR gains were symmetric in both eyes, as well as in both clockwise and counterclockwise directions, with a mean gain of 0.19. In patients with skew deviation, mean OCR gain in the hypertropic eye was 0.08±0.02 which was significantly lower than that in normal subjects (p=0.02). Mean OCR gain in the hypotropic eye was 0.15±0.03 and did not differ from normal (p=0.28). No differences in gains were found between clockwise and counterclockwise directions in both hypertropic and hypotropic eyes of patients.

Conclusions: : The asymmetric static OCR gain in patients with skew deviation provides support that imbalance of the utricular-ocular pathway is a mechanism for skew deviation.

Keywords: eye movements • neuro-ophthalmology: diagnosis • ocular motor control 
×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×